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Crinkling Paper Techniques FAQs & some paper vocab March 21 2024

Not all crinkled paper is made the same..... and not all crinkled paper is referred to in quite the same way. What does "momigami" refer to? The word "momi" literally means "crinkled" or "kneaded"- It's a descriptor for the following noun "kami" or "gami" (as a suffix) meaning "paper". In Japanese "shi" is also used a suffix meaning "paper". "Momu" is the verb "to knead" in Japanese. There is hand-crinkled paper, typically using "the one-fist-at-a-time" method. That's how we crinkled this heavyweight marbled kōzo paper for facemasks we sewed on a sewing machine. The sheets became softer and more fabric-like the more we crinkled them. The masks were quite comfortable on one's face; the paper was soft for the skin. The image below shows our vintage Momi Kōzo Papers recently added to our shop. The more fancy metallic version are now up on our shop too: Fancy Momi Kōzo Papers. These 2-ply papers are crinkled and dyed on the "front" side, and also have a flat (un-crinkled), white backing. Here's a little video of crinkling paper mask crinkling Absolutely any paper can be crinkled, and can be called "momigami". However, in the world of washi (Japanese paper), we typically see momigami made with a large dyed piece of kōzo paper sometimes known as "mingeishi'. When washi is creped with a tool (instead of the hand) then the paper is referred to as creped in English, however, Japanese it can still be referred to as "momi-something". For example above here is an image of "momi chiyogami" or chirimen- gami . chirimen (creped) gami or kami for paper. Momi chiyogami is crinkled or creped with a straight bar tool; using a tool like a stick or bar, allows you to crinkle or crepe paper a little more evenly; like image above. Above is a before and after photo of turning regular wrapping paper into a creped paper by using a large, traditional, very analogue creping process. What does "kyōseishi" refer to? Kyōseishi = Momigami with starch. In this case, "kyōsei" means "strengthened". The correct word for to refer to a paper both crinkled and starched with konjac or konnyaku is kyōseishi or sometimes "kamiko" if made into large extended lengths of kyoseishi. The photo above depicts a beautiful pillow made out of kyōseishi. Here's a little video on the toughness of kyōsei We also have these gorgeous starched papers covered with gold leaf dust- they are called Kindeishi or (kin) "gold" (dei) "mud" (shi) "paper": in English their nickname is "muddy gold paper". They are basically very starched kyōseishi with gold leaf dust. What is "joomchi" ? Is an ancient Korean craft and the best translation is felted paper, but instead of felting with soap, which one would use with wool, only water and good quality kōzo paper is necessary. Image below depicts the craft of joomchi. Click here for more of our blog posts related to joomchi.
MORE PAPER VOCAB! The word "kōzo" is the Japanese word for the paper mulberry fiber made from what is known in English as the paper mulberry bush or (Broussonetia papyrifera).
The Korean word is "cham dak".
The word "hanji"' is the word for paper hand-crafted in Korea.
The majority of hanji happens to be made from paper mulberry fiber.

Hand Papermaking in RI November 04 2023

During 89 yrs young Ayako Yoshizumi's tough schedule of teaching, lecturing and doing demonstrations while visiting lil' ol'Rhode Island , (please read previous blog post), I was so grateful to have several incredibly hard-working volunteers helping, who also maintain a great appreciation of hand papermaking and tradtional crafts. Here is a wonderful blog post by one of our favorite supporters: "Ms. Noriko Crasso", who is a talented local artist in many mediums. This is Noriko's original blog post in Japanese: https://www.hamaguri.net/chatting/art-annex-papermakin The English version is below here. Thank you Noriko! I am so happy that you were inspired to write this post. Lauren

“Art Annex” Papermaking Workshop

I went to a paper-making workshop hosted by Lauren from Paper Connection, who is helping out with the Tanabata Festival.

Lauren's papermaking teachers, Ayako Sensei and her daughter Tomo WASHI YOSHI, were visiting from Japan. Ayako-sensei is now 89 years old, but she is still in good health! With her spine straight, her eyes were drawn to the image of her mixing water with kozo.

The American participants in the workshop communicated with each other through gestures, which made me happy as well.

The plant ``Kouzo'', which is the raw material for paper, is mixed with water along with ``neri'' or ``yam'', which acts as ``glue'', and then filtered in a sieve.
Shake the screen back and forth to drain the water and distribute the kozo evenly.
Carefully remove the paper from the screen, dry it in the sun, and it's done.

At the ``WASHI YOSHI'' workshop held in Japan, we deliberately sand the mulberry to make it uneven in the bamboo basket, layer colored mulberry on top of each other, and create small holes in the mulberry. It seems that each participant is enjoying the original art.

In addition to paper making, I also learned how to make Kinkarakami paper. You can make such wonderful things! I was so impressed! (My son loves gold, so he was overjoyed when I brought it home.)

We use paper casually on a daily basis, but when you think about how each sheet of paper used to go through many processes in the past, it makes you think, ``Thank you so much,'' even for paper made with machines today. ” It seems that the feeling will grow!

Ayako-sensei carefully checking the drying paper was illuminated by the sunlight and looked very impressive.
Ayako-sensei checking that the paper is dry

Thank you very much Lauren-san, Ayako-sensei, and Tomo-san! Thank you for your hard work!

``WASHI YOSHI'' Instagram You can see the workshop held in Rhode Island and creative works using various handmade washi papers.

"Art Annex" Instagram This is the studio of LAUREN PEARLMAN SUGITA and SUZI BALLENGER in Pawtucket . Various interesting workshops are held here. ● ``Paper Connection'' website Lauren's company sells Japanese paper and Japanese paper accessories.

Introducing the Yoshizumi Duo September 10 2023

I am proud to introduce you to my papermaking teacher- Ms. Ayako Yoshizumi, now 89 years old, with whom I met her daughter- Tomoko in 2018. Ayako and Tomoko Yoshizumi are a mother/daughter duo from the Western side of Tokyo, Japan co-teaching papermaking and paper arts workshops in many parts of the world including Mexico and Romania. For 35 years Ayako has taught papermaking at the Yamazaki Elementary School in Tokyo to students between the ages of 7-13. Several years ago, Tomoko joined her mother in spreading the word about the importance of paper made with one’s own hands. With access to the school’s professional papermaking studio, the Yoshizumis are keenly focused on teaching the elderly population, which is the fastest growing segment of the Japanese population; known as the “silver” population.Both inside and outside of Japan, the duo has made it their mission to teach how “washi”-Japanese handmade paper, can be used in everyday life, as it was hundreds of years ago and to ensure it will be used by future generations. I have learned many new techniques from Ayako Yoshizumi and I am grateful for the friendship that quickly formed between the 3 of us. You can only imagine how SUPER-excited I am to host the mother/daughter duo to my hometown and have them teach weekend workshops in mid-October at our brand new studio in Pawtucket, RI: the Art Annex. During the same stay, together we will take part in PAPER TIDES: the North American Hand Papermakers conference at RI School of Design and give a demonstration on Friday afternoon, October 20th at the RISD Auditorium inside 20 Washington Place, Providence, RI. The demonstration will review the history and how-to's of Kinkara kami or gilded embossed wallpaper . It is Ayako Yoshizumi's first time in the USA. Let's all give a warm welcome and may New England show off its best ever autumn leaves' colors this October! By the Paperwoman- Lauren Pearlman Sugita. The name of their enterprise is called Washi Yoshi- click to see their Instagram page.

Amy Trendler ❤️s Our Yuzen & Lokta Papers March 13 2023

Hello!

I've been meaning to send photos of books I've made with paper from Paper Connection. These notebooks started for personal use (wavy lines green Laurelai Designs), and gifts to friends & family (yuzen blue waves & lokta white floral on lime). I recently started making books to sell (like your blue katazome - a hard one for me to part with, and the botanical lokta papers).

You'll recognize more from Paper Connection in my shop: www.etsy.com/shop/aetbooks. I also wanted to send a "thank you" for making these papers available, including where they come from and what they are suited for. I enjoy mixing & matching designs, textures, and paper weights. I've been jokingly, telling people that I'm starting to make books to sell to support my love of acquiring decorative paper. Actually, there is a grain of truth to this humor!

Hanji is my next experiment and I'm thrilled to discover a great selection of Korean-made papers in your shop. I'll be placing another order soon! Thanks again for making all these amazing papers available. Best, Amy T

Editor's Note: Check out Amy's site to see more beautiful pieces using 100% recycled rag paper from India, amate, plus many beautiful combinations of textures and colors. Thank you, Amy!

September's Pastiche-Subscription Sampler September 01 2022

With a hint of cooler days to come, our September Pastiche will warm you with some rich, jewel-toned papers. This is our third month of Pastiche and moving full steam ahead. These fallish colors and textures are sure to get your creative juices thrumming! September Pastiche includes a bit of Lokta paper: Off- White Floral on Kelly Green, Woodblock Hands, Turquoise, and Woodblock Quatrefoil. Prints and solids at the ready. We've talked about Lokta and the bush's strong, silky fibers, and its leadership as a main source of fiber for local papermakers of Nepal. Don't forget about its characteristics of smooth-surfaced, ideal for book arts, printing, card making, collage, box making, sewing, and interior design projects. You can check out our complete Lokta family of papers here. We've got a 100% Rayon Red in the bunch. Very fabric-like which lends itself to sewing, laser printers, invitations, cards, graphics, etc. Acid-free and quiet (no-noise paper). Check out the entire Rayon Family here. Japanese Lace Asanoha is from the classic hemp leaf and comes in six colors. Delicate-looking pattern, excellent for collages and many crafts/applications. Oh yes! Katazome! Traditional designs are reminiscent of Southeast Asian batiks. These are opaque patterned papers great for book covers, end sheets, boxes, graphic design, framing, origami, and mixed media projects. Katazome, or Sarasa paper is decorated with a combo of stenciling and resist dyeing. It's laborious but the results are so lovely. See for yourself. Last, but never at the end of the line is An-Jing Lucy Yellow-Tan, the fun and funky family member of our An-Jing paper collection handmade mainly from xuan ("shwen") fiber. Typically these papers are lightweight and ideal for brush painting, and collage. They are and a bit dainty to work with, so consider the challenges in using them for printing; good for hand-printing (gently apply inked block to paper- or paper to inked block- press by hand.) You can check out the entire family here.
More to Come!
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A Paper Pastiche- New Subscription Sampler August 12 2022

Helpful Details!
More Colors, Weights, Depths, to Come!
paper sampler, July Pastiche, collage pack Last Month's Beauties

Summer for many countries.

The weather flecks between less consistent heat, with lower temps that remind us the season is just beginning to transition from the strength of July's sun. July was the premiere launch of our subscription service. We had so much fun deciding what we wanted for each month and came up with tons of winners!

The low-down on August's Pastiche selections:

With a hint of cooler days to come, August holds Lokta's Olive Brown and Pumpkin as two earthy and organic pals. The lokta bush produces strong but silky fibers, and is the main source of fiber for local papermakers of Nepal. Nepali hand papermakers are maintaining traditional hand papermaking methods in their communities, and at the same time sustaining their livelihoods. The result is a strong, somewhat smooth-surfaced sheet, ideal for book arts, printing, card making, collage, box making, sewing, and interior design projects. You can check out our complete lokta family of papers here. Pull and shape, tear and sew, paint and crumble, print and fold. This Paper Pastiche is beauty coming your way in bite-size pieces. Laurelai Designs are fashion and eco-conscious patterns designed by a couple of paperwomen exclusively for Paper Connection International. All are silk-screened on a handmade, recycled, cotton paper chosen for its mat surface. All backs and fronts of each of the 18 styles meant to work in any combination, for card, box, and bookmaking and, of course, collage, made from handmade recycled silkscreened rag paper. The upbeat and bold patterns will certainly inspire! Speaking of changing weather, An-Jing Meteor Shower has some very interesting properties when printed. Recently used in the making of Gyotaku prints, this paper is way too cool. Water-based ink allowed the 'meteors' to show through. All handmade in Sichuan, China of "xuan" (pronounced "shwen") fiber is traditionally used for painting calligraphy. It's been used for making boxes, envelope liners, end pages, lampshades, quilling, collage, and, of course, printing. Head on over to shop.paperconnection.com and see the rest of the pack. This yellow Tengujoushi is the machine-made version of the thinnest specialty Japanese paper in the world. Funny how super light-weight it is but crazy strong. 100% hemp fiber, prepared by hand, with the final sheets formed by machine. It's sheer and comes in soft/soothing colors (black too). Conservators love this paper for strengthening holes in pages or works on paper, but it's also ideal for collage, like "chigiri-e" printmaking-chine collé, and silkscreen with wax. Japanese Lace Uminami or "Sekaiha" with backing. Everyone needs to have a piece of paper lace. If for no other reason than imagination. A lovely/traditional pattern of waves. So delicate it's backed with a thin paper. The overall effect is translucent minus the open spaces of lace. Think collage, lampshades, window treatments, bookmaking, card designs, paper sculpture. And there is the all handmade Jewel-Toned Cotton Lime Green Stripes, screen printed stripes adorning a bright green, opaque paper made from cotton from recycled t-shirts. It's got a nice sturdy body that will complement many applications- even making posters with letterpress printed messages. Want to sign up?

Cyanotypes - Artist Sarah Dunn Talks Accessible Art-making August 11 2022

There are many terrifying things about finishing college. Many graduates are concerned with entering the real-world market. For me, it was entering a world without 24/7 print shop access. What was I to do without acid baths, graining sinks, pressure washers, and printing presses? Answer: Cyanotype. I have worked in most printmaking methods, but cyanotype hadn't piqued my interest. What can I say? I am not a blue person. The realization that there was an accessible method and materials that didn't require traditional makers spaces was evolutionary. All I needed was a dark room and a sunny day. Cyanotypes were invented in the 1840s by astronomer and chemist John Federick William Herschel. Anna Atkins, a trained botanist, popularized the technique by establishing this photographic process as an accurate alternative to scientific illustration. One of the earliest examples is her book, Photographs of British Algae: Cyanotype Impressions. Cyanotypes are defined as, irreproducible prints, with white silhouettes on Prussian blue grounds. A mixture of equal parts ferric ammonium citrate and potassium ferricyanide is applied in a low-light environment. Jacquard makes an easy-to-use kit found at most art retailers. The importance of coating your paper evenly and in a low-light environment will ensure further success. A foam brush gets an even layer and clean margins. However, I love the look of using a brush and creating wispy margins. After coating, the paper is left to dry in your 'darkened room.' An actual dark room with red light is ideal. However, you can use a low-lit room with covered windows. I usually put them in the bathtub. Works like a charm.
Laying in the sun
Papers, most recently tried: Natural Kozo Medium Weight M-0202 White Kozo Heavyweight G-0001 Green Tea Flecks on Green G-0016 Mitsumata Unryu Heavy Weight Brushed Surface G-0006 Masa Soft White I-MM or I-MMLg Now the fun part. Exposure! Artists traditionally arrange their compositions in a dark room. If you lack bat vision, move into a more lit area as long as your coated paper remains out of direct sunlight - the brighter the area, the faster you'll need to work. The first time I tried making cyanotypes, I arranged my entire composition outside in direct sunlight. It felt like a fast-paced game show. Not exactly a relaxing experience. However, the prints worked due to my lightning speed. I suggest placing your coated paper on a sheet of plexiglass, firm paper, or cardboard before arranging your composition. This will make transferring your piece into the sunlight easier. Arrange objects you'd like exposed, remembering that cyanotypes are silhouettes of objects. If you place a smaller leaf inside a large leaf, the larger leaf will only be exposed. The larger consumes the smaller leaf. After completing your composition, place a sheet of clear glass, plexiglass, or acetate on top to weigh down the objects. Your sandwiched cardboard, paper, and Plexi are ready to move outside into direct sunlight. I strongly recommend using rocks or other paperweights to hold down your work if you use acetate instead of glass or plexiglass. The wind can and will blow everything away. It’s embarrassing chasing after your artwork in the parking lot while your neighbors watch. Ask me how I know.
Stopping the process with a water bath
Once the cyanotype turns a bronzy-brown color, it is ready to be washed out. Carry the entire sandwich out of direct sunlight. Use cool water to wash the print. Many artists prefer to do this in some kind of low vat or tub, continuously agitating the paper by rocking the vat back and forth or using their hands. The print is thoroughly washed out when the ground has turned blue, and the silhouettes lighten. While it dries, the Prussian blue grows deeper in color.
Dry version on the left, the wet version on the right
Since the 1840s, this is how traditional cyanotypes were made. However, as with any medium, artists have pushed boundaries. My personal favorite is wet cyanotypes. This technique adds manipulators such as herbs, salt, pepper, coffee grounds, and lemon juice while the paper is still wet with chemistry, creating multiple colors and variations. Move sandwiched piece (while wet) into the sun to finish exposure. The results have a more painterly appearance, with the overall look of being hand-dyed. This method gives a more botanical or nature-inspired feel.
Salt and soap bubbles
Amendments added to your wet work create texture and color: Salt makes small spots or an acid-dye effect. Lemon juice produces large spots. Foamy soap gives a subtle washy effect, changing the deep blue background to earthy green. Kitchen items such as turmeric, paprika, tea, and coffee can be sprinkled to create more color variations. Experiment with any and everything! Effects will vary. The rest of the wet process is similar to the traditional dry cyanotype except for exposure time. Dry cyanotypes take 5-30 minutes, determined by sun conditions. Wet cyanotypes may take up to 24 hours. Generally, the longer you can leave exposed to the sun, the better. I typically leave mine for two hours in full sun. I recently taught a workshop at Paper Connection with students waiting as little as 30 minutes before washing their prints. Their pieces turned out beautifully. Currently, I am using wet cyanotypes to re-panel lampshades I thrifted. The light shining through really emphasizes the subtleties in texture and color. Overall, I love the accessibility cyanotypes give my artistic practice. I enjoy making simply for the joy it brings me. What will you make with cyanotypes? I would love to see. Stay tuned for more workshops through Paper Connection. Many thanks to Lauren Pearlman for helping with photography.
Sarah Dunn - Artist-in-residence Instagram@sarah.is.dunn sarahdunnstudio.com
Note: In the next blog post, we'll do a deeper dive into papers that work well with cyanotypes. Check out our Monthly Subscription Service and Shop Paper Pastiche! our papers help tell your story - want more? http://paperconnection.com/news/

PD Packard on Creative Freedom June 23 2022

Artist, PD Packard Photo Credit: Faye Arranz
We checked in with PD Packard. How did your creative journey bring you to this place? I’ve always had a natural love of color. When growing up in Washington, D.C., and trying to determine how I would make an income with this love of color, I believed that going to a university would be the answer. I began studying fashion design at Parsons School of Design in NYC. Through an exchange program, I applied for and was awarded a full scholarship to Saint Martin’s School of Art (aka Central Saint Martin’s), in London, England. There I obtained a BFA in Fashion and Textile Design. At Saint Martin’s I was given a lot of creative freedom, something that had been missing at Parsons. Most of my days at Saint Martin’s were spent working in the textile department dyeing and printing fabrics, and then executing many self-indulgent, crazy-butt ideas for clothing and accessories that weren’t viewed as very commercial by my teachers. It was a wonderful foundation and even today experimenting without restraints is a very important part of developing any of my ideas, helping me discern and refine each step towards completion.
Travel & Cosmetic Bags, designed under the PD Packard Label Medium: 100% Cotton Size: Various Date: 1986 - 1996
When I returned to the states in the late 80s, I began designing packaging, POP displays, and original textile and surface designs primarily for the cosmetic industry in NYC. Under my own label, PD Packard, I also designed and produced exclusive lines of travel and cosmetic bags for the department stores Barneys New York & Japan, Neiman Marcus, Henri Bendel, and Bergdorf Goodman that were sold nationally and internationally. There’s real money to be made in production. The problem was that I felt I was always squeezed like a lemon, asked to produce cheaper, faster, and to make it happen yesterday. I grew to dislike the work and one day decided to stop. Many of the principles in printmaking are similar to fabric and surface design making an easy and natural transition for me into fine art printmaking in 2009. How would you define your art and what is the meaning behind your work? I am called a Multimedia Artist, using printmaking in combination with different medias and techniques; photography, animation, and painting to share my love for color, and pattern. My work is committed to bringing attention to the power that Nature has to influence our perception of art and design. I am not the expressor, I am the expression. When I begin a project, I try to let go of my ego and be open and receptive to inspiration. In the essay, “The Untroubled Mind" (1972), the painter/author Agnes Martin, speaks of art as beauty, and states that this beauty is unattached, that it’s in your Mind; it’s inspirational. I believe that this inspiration is free and available to all, beyond person, place, or thing; it’s unconditional Love. Unconditional Love means that I will remain committed to my work even if the condition seems unfavorable. Regardless of the circumstance or outcome, I am self-motivated to continue my work because of this unconditional Love. Can you describe the importance of paper (or other mediums) in your work, what type of paper (medium) you use most, and why?
Printed Decorative Papers
Medium: Relief printmaking method, M-0207 Kozo White Text Weight with Sizing-56gsm and M-0202 Natural Kozo Medium Weight-44gsm.
Size: 25” height x 37” width
Dates: Various
The paper I use is basically Kozo x Kozo = Kozo. Initially, when creating my artwork, I used mostly papers made from cotton. Around 2010, I met the NYC-based Japanese artist, Yasuyo Tanaka, while taking a class on Japanese Bookbinding with her at the Manhattan Graphics Center. I noted how wonderful the collection of Japanese Kozo papers that Yasuyo used, and she shared Paper Connection as her source. Since then, I’ve been using Paper Connection’s fine art papers, specifically whites, and naturals, in my work. My foundation is painting. I love the depth of color I can achieve through layering when working in watercolors. In 2009 I began using the Akua Intaglio Printmaking Inks trying to translate this layered, watercolor effect into printmaking but found my prints became too saturated with ink. A turning point came in 2015 when from a brief demonstration on the use of Akua Liquid Pigments by the artist and Akua Inks inventor, Susan Rostow, I was inspired to experiment. A medium entirely new to my printmaking process, I discovered that with the Akua Liquid Pigments I could print almost unlimited sheer layers of color. An absolute necessity in creating this method of decorative paper is the use of Japanese Kozo paper, or in English, mulberry paper. Kozo is highly absorbent and has long fibers that give the paper strength and durability to withstand multiple layers of ink. Two Paper Connection papers that work well for this method are M-0207 Kozo White Text Weight with Sizing-56gsm, and M-0202 Natural Kozo Medium Weight-44gsm. With this medium, I’ve developed a technique for creating printed decorative papers that I use in almost every aspect of my work; book art, sculpture, installation, animation, and much more. Printed Decorative Papers are all about the color story. To really experience the full extent of this process, you start by committing to a color story with a minimum of 5 or more different colors. The more colors you use, the better the effect so it’s important to be courageous and keep applying layers. I take dried flowers and leaves I’ve harvested from my garden or collected off the streets of NYC and lay them in a pattern of my desire on top of a Plexi printmaking plate that has been coated with Akua Liquid Pigment. During the printing process, I try to be open to - rethink, adapt, or change, if something is not moving as planned. The finished print usually ends up with 15+ layers of different colors with a beautiful, layered effect, somewhat like watercolor. To know more about my technique for Printing Decorative Papers with Akua Inks, you can find the video on the Akua Printshop Channel here > https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jGZYtCZ4ul4 Are there papers from Paper Connection that you can speak about/provide insights, elaborations, process, and/or integrity of quality? Two projects of mine that I believe showcase the strength, diversity, and beauty of the Japanese Kozo paper from Paper Connection are OUTSHINE fear and Armour Clad In LOVE. On a practical note, I’ve learned from Paper Connection’s owner, Lauren Pearlman Sugita, that Kozo is an environmentally friendly traditional Japanese papermaking product. Because the Kozo bush is a renewable shrub that’s harvested annually, the plants will regenerate continually for many years. OUTSHINE fear is a series of works that combine the very popular alternative photographic method cyanotype and laser-cut Plexi plates created from computer-generated designs.
OUTSHINE fear, Watch Thought, NO fear
Medium: Gold Akua Intaglio Ink on Laser cut Plexi printing plates,
Aiko’s AI-232 Sakamoto Natural LW Kozo paper, combined with
alternative photographic method cyanotype.
Size: 18” height x 24” width
Date: August 2020
The cyanotype photos were developed on Aiko’s AI-232 Sakamoto Natural LW. The Sakamoto paper works brilliantly when developing and exposing the image onto the paper achieving beautiful, clear images. Because of the strength of the paper, it’s possible to expose or tone the image many times without the paper breaking down. Unfortunately, the papers are no longer being produced. This project was based on the prompt: Question: How does one encourage and motivate others when opportunity appears to be limited? Answer: LOVE MORE for every hate. I am a parent and an educator living and working in NYC. On March 22, 2020, my twin 17 years old daughters were informed that they would not be returning to their high school, three months shy of their graduation. They were attending a NYC performance & art high school, both in the visual arts program. Art is social, so when the school began teaching remotely many of the students did not show up to the online classes. Without the use of the school’s studio space, art supplies, and direct guidance from teachers and their peers, many students found it difficult to work on their own. Some students became despondent and didn’t complete their work. Through the years I've been taking photos of my children and using them as my muse. It’s a great working relationship because they’re very trusting and not concerned about how they look in the final artwork. It’s very liberating for me as an artist.

For reference, you can find the original post for OUTSHINE fear here: https://www.pdpackardlovemore.com/post/outshine-fear

Discord Is The Absence of Truth Medium: Gold Akua Intaglio Ink on Laser cut Plexi printing plates, Aiko’s AI-232 Sakamoto Natural LW Kozo paper, combined with alternative photographic method cyanotype. Size: 18” height x 12” width Date: August 2020 SOUL AWARENESS NOT sense awareness Medium: Gold Akua Intaglio Ink on Laser cut Plexi printing plates, Aiko’s AI-232 Sakamoto Natural LW Kozo paper, combined with alternative photographic method cyanotype. Size: 18” height x 12” width Date: August 2020
The Photographic Process for SOUL AWARENESS NOT sense awareness
Top Right Image: Original Image
Top Left Image: Inverted Transparency (negative) Use to Expose Print
Bottom Right Image: Chemical Reaction to Sensitized (coated with cyanotype formula) Sakamoto Kozo Paper Exposed to Sun.
Bottom Left Image: Final Print After Toned in Borax Bath
unclasp the hold on thought: think ANEW Medium: Gold Akua Intaglio Ink on Laser cut Plexi printing plates, Aiko’s AI-232 Sakamoto Natural LW Kozo paper, combined with alternative photographic method cyanotype. Size: 18” height x 12” width Date: August 2020 Process for unclasp the hold on thought: think ANEW Left Image: Computer Generated Artwork for Printing Plate Right Image: Akua Intaglio Metallic Gold Inked Laser Cut Plexi Printmaking Plate Life living Love loving Soul feeling Mind knowing Medium: Gold Akua Intaglio Ink on Laser cut Plexi printing plates, Aiko’s AI-232 Sakamoto Natural LW Kozo paper, combined with alternative photographic method cyanotype. Size: 18” height x 12” width Date: August 2020 Armour Clad in LOVE: quarantine in NYC During the end of the March 2020 quarantine in NYC, I took early morning walks through nearby Prospect Park, in Brooklyn, NY, collecting tree parts to use as content for the short films I create. With skills from my years designing in the fashion industry, I created a suit using the printing plates from OUTSHINE fear and my printed decorative papers on Japanese Kozo paper. The Kozo paper is so strong and resilient that the suit can actually be worn. The suit represents the idea of our earth, and all of humanity as being armour clad, and protected by LOVE.
Armour Clad in LOVE
Medium: Decorative paper & Akua Intaglio Ink on Laser
cut Plexi printing plates, M-0207 Kozo White Text Weight
with Sizing-56gsm.
Size: 72” height x 50” width, assembled
Date: April 2020
Armour Clad in LOVE, jacket stitch detail
Medium: Decorative paper & Akua Intaglio Ink on Laser
cut Plexi printing plates, M-0207 Kozo White Text Weight
with Sizing-56gsm.
Size: 72” height x 50” width, assembled
Date: April 2020
Armour Clad in LOVE, pant stitch detail
Medium: Decorative paper & Akua Intaglio Ink on Laser
cut Plexi printing plates, M-0207 Kozo White Text Weight
with Sizing-56gsm.
Size: 72” height x 50” width, assembled
Date: April 2020
Ground Print for Armour Clad in LOVE
Medium: A ground layer was created using my Printed Decorative
paper method, using dried plants as a stencil together with printing
multiple layers of plates inked with the transparent-like Akua Liquid
Pigments on M-0207 Kozo White Text Weight with Sizing-56gsm.
Size: 25” height x 37” width
Date: April 2020
Inked laser-cut Plexi printing plate used for
Armour Clad in LOVE
Medium: The final top layer was printed with the Akua Intaglio
Inks using laser-cut Plexi printing plates. The sheen on the print
was created by adding silver metallic intaglio ink to ultramarine
blue and phthalo blue. The original designs for the laser-cut plates were computer-generated.
Size: 25” height x 37” width
Date: April 2020
For reference, you can find the original post here: https://www.pdpackardlovemore.com/post/armour-clad-in-love-quarantine-in-nyc What influences inspire you and why? In the book, Saul Bass A Life in Film & Design, he describes the ideal trademark as “thinking made visible.” That’s a principle I strive to express in my artwork. I’ve always loved bold graphics, with self-similar images and mathematical order. In the late 80s, a friend took me to hear a lecture on graphic design given at FIT (Fashion Institute of Technology), in NYC. I had no idea who the guest speaker was, and in my naive mind, he looked like some regular, middle-aged man wearing a suit and heavy, black-rimmed glasses. He was introduced as Saul Bass, the American graphic designer, and filmmaker. From the start, I was incredibly impressed with his work especially when he showed his title sequences he had created for many well-known movies, like The Pink Panther and for films by Alfred Hitchcock. For Hitchcock’s movies, North by Northwest, Vertigo, and Psycho, Bass invented this type of kinetic typography in his title sequences that I love. Bass was also a prolific trademark or logo designer, and many of his logos are still in use today, showing the longevity and strength of his work. Longevity and strength are traits that I greatly admire in anyone's work. Graphics and film have made a big, inspirational impact on me as a designer and visual artist. In 2018, I began creating short films, or vignettes. I use printmaking in combination with Nature to create visual poetry that shares my thirst for color, nature, and unconditional LOVE, not conditional romance. To bring my artwork to life I interlace and overlay live-action video with flat animation mediums in combination with music that flow from one scene to the next. My most recent short film project was organized by the artist pair, Phyllis and Victor Merriam of the thepostdigitalprintmakers, and Susan Rostow of Akua Inks. I was invited to create an original animation for PRINTFLIX, a film screening featuring ten artists that use printmaking in combination with animation. The screening was held during the SGC International MakerReady Virtual Event Saturday, April 10, 2021, showcasing the Armour Clad in LOVE suit made with papers sourced from Paper Connection. Short Film, Armour Clad in LOVE: Paper Connection papers used: Aiko’s AI-232 Sakamoto Natural LW, Natural Kozo Medium Weight-44gsm M-0202, and Kozo paper G-0008. Mediums: Drypoint etching, Relief printmaking, laser-cut printmaking plates, and cyanotype. View Here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R4Fo-u4w5_0 If you could converse with any artist present/past, who would it be and what would you ask? Due credit goes to Kojiro Ikegami, one of Japan’s leading professional bookbinders. Many years ago, I bought his book titled, Japanese Book-binding, Instructions from a Master Craftsman. Although I believe he is no longer living, I would love to have had the opportunity to thank him for generously sharing instructions for making major, historically important styles of Japanese binding and book cases. I find that when you’re focused on creating the most beautiful artwork, or in his case, binding books, most of your time is spent resolving technical problems that might come up when executing a piece. It takes a lot of humility to freely share your knowledge with others when you’ve spent a lifetime committed to perfecting your skills. I am so grateful that I have access to his easy-to-use book-binding instructions and have been able to expand his principles into box art, custom-framed artwork, freestanding walls, and so much more. I can only imagine how special the opportunity was to train under this master. Do you have any upcoming shows?
Artist, PD Packard working in her Brooklyn, NY studio. Photo Credit: Faye Arranz
I am currently part of the traveling exhibition called: CONNECT: Small Prints by Members of The Boston Printmakers 2021 – 2023 This small print show was developed in partnership with the venerable Providence Art Club in Rhode Island to celebrate The Boston Printmakers upcoming 75th anniversary in 2023. Prompted by the theme of “communication,” with a suggested image size of a cell phone, or no larger than 8”x10”, members of the Boston Printmakers were asked to create prints about “messaging,” “news,” or content they wanted to “post." Upcoming Exhibition Dates: October 2022: Oregon Society of Artists, Portland OR Dates TBA March 5, 2023 – April 5, 2023: Center for Contemporary Printmaking Share your current projects: Since March 2022 I’ve been working with the American composer, songwriter, and producer Paul Brill on a commission to create the artwork for his latest 12” vinyl record, The Cost of Believing, and for "45" or 7-inch vinyl singles scheduled to debut in October 2022. Paul gave me the freedom to create what I want, which is an artist’s dream. I am truly grateful for this commission. Initially, it was a challenge because there were practically no rules and infinite directions in which I could go. I’ve listened to his music several times during the process of recording the album, but my focus was on interpreting his lyrics visionally for the album cover in the most beautiful, collaborative way. On June 9th I presented the first step of the project, a body of original artwork for the album cover that consisted of sixteen unique pieces. Using the techniques of cyanotype, decorative papers, and laser-cut printing plates all the original artwork was created on Aiko's Sakamoto Heavyweight-AI-224B, Kozoshi Natural Extra Heavyweight-M-0206-#3-80gsm and Kozo White Text Weight with Sizing-56gsm M-0207. Here’s a selection of the recently presented artwork for the album covers.
God Loves You the Most
Medium: Alternative photographic method
cyanotype on Aiko's Sakamoto Heavyweight-AI-224B
Size: 12.5” height x 12.5” width
Date: June 2022
Unblunted Mind
Medium: Alternative photographic method
cyanotype on Aiko's Sakamoto Heavyweight-AI-224B
Size: 12.5” height x 12.5” width
Date: June 2022
The Promise of Light
Medium: Computer-designed laser-cut Plexi printing plate, decorative papers, on Kozoshi Natural Extra Heavyweight-M-0206-#3-80gsm
Size: 24” height x 18” width
Date: June 2022
The Cost of Believing
Medium: Computer-designed laser-cut Plexi
printing plate, decorative papers, on Kozoshi
Natural Extra Heavyweight M-0206-#3-80gsm
Size: 12.5” height x 12.5” width
Date: June 2022
PD Packard Contact Email pdpackard@pdpackard.com Website www.pdpackard.com
Fricka Jones - Artist, Designer, Imagineer, Writer, Editor, Collaborator, Support maricooh@gmail.com patriciajones.crevado.com
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Discovery: Artist Mimi King on Relief & Intaglio Printmaking July 23 2021

Mimi King
November, of last year, I sat down to try my hand at relief printmaking. I thought it would be a one-off experiment, a stop-gap until I could access etching baths again. I love intaglio, the process of it, the amount of waiting, planning, and consideration it requires. The details that can be achieved with an etching needle make my heart race, and yet, the immediacy of relief printmaking is so rewarding. My introduction to printmaking began abstractly. Both intaglio and monotype taught me valuable lessons about allowing the process to simply be. When working with monotype, it may look one way on the plexiglass, but entirely different once printed. It was first explained to me like this, “You may use the same process, the same inks, the same solvents, paper, etc., day in, day out, you will never make the same print twice.” This appealed to me as someone new to the art world at the time, I didn’t need to stress about monotypes because it will be, what it will be.
Intaglio Etching
Relief Cat Print

“You may use the same process, the same inks, the same solvents, paper, etc., day in, day out. But you will never make the same print twice.”


Relief Linocut on Washi Paper
Butterfly Pea Citrus Kakigori
Intaglio offered a way to reproduce the same image again and again. I learned monotype before an intaglio crash course in the summer of 2014. My approach to intaglio was more laissez-faire. If there was a foul bite (such as the four deep circles in my kakigori print to the left), it simply became part of the print. The stronger my confidence in my drawing skills, the more frustrated I became when a line didn’t etch the way I hoped. So much happens during the intaglio process that can’t be entirely predicted, most taking place inside the acid bath which can’t be realized until the plate has been removed, cleaned, and proofed. With relief printing, the moment I finish carving a line, I know whether it’s turned out or whether I need to adjust something. Intaglio taught me to be patient and trust (or just accept) the process. Relief gives me the freedom to work fast and print often. Relief and Intaglio Work in Opposites - In etching/intaglio, your image is created from below the surface of the plate, your negative or etched space is what shows up in your design. For etched prints, you force ink into grooves you've created while buffing the surface clean of excess ink. Time-consuming for a large etched plate, it’s laborious. Whereas with relief printmaking the image is on the surface area carved which is inked with a roller - the carved area is the negative or un-inked areas. The one thing that is true for both types of printmaking is the way the lines appear before the first proofing. With fine details, like the fur on my recent cat prints (see image above), which appear before the block is even inked.
Mono-type Linocut on Gampi
After admiring other relief printmakers’ work for years, it’s joyous to find that I’ve taken so well to this style of printmaking. My drawing comes through more clearly than with intaglio and I’m not tied to a press. Thanks to water-based inks, I can print anywhere, as long as I have a flat surface. A whole world of opportunities has opened itself through relief printmaking, from residencies not equipped for printmaking to printing while on vacation or traveling. There are papers to be explored that simply would not have lent themselves to etching that is wide open to relief. Etching presses the ink into the fibers of the paper, relief sits on top of those fibers. Lokta, leaf embedded papers, and heavily textured papers will become part of my visual language, adding a new richness to the Asian paper catalog I’ve slowly constructed for myself. As work progresses, I build upon skills, ready to enter unchartered waters of large-scale pieces. Mimi King on PCI papers that tell your story Mimi King (@mimikingstudio) Mimi King Studio: Shop Mimi King | Facebook

Play Versus Purpose with A.I.R. Lisa Perez March 13 2019

Play Versus Purpose #playwithpaperconnection

The theme for my belated first contribution as Artist in Residence here at Paper Connection, evolved naturally out of a struggle that we all find ourselves up against at times in our creative practice.
creativity, play, paper artist, washi, paper connection international Some explorations + tests to get to know new papers - photo: Lisa Perez
The list of what we think must get accomplished, or should happen a particular way oppresses us with expectation... Coupled with self-editing before something even begins, we derail our process. I know I should take my own advice to my students when they are feeling stuck: PLAY – Jump in and explore materials and processes without judgement or expectation. It’s simple and direct, present moment action that fosters creativity. With that in mind, I also believe that we are always more successful when we are resourceful, respecting our plentiful resources - meaning use what’s on hand, and find ways to avoid waste in the processes we love. It is this exploration that becomes the rich and fertile practice that we all can appreciate.
Play is productive.....
One word...PLAY. So, get into the studio, play with what’s on hand, and show us what happens - tag it on instagram: #playwithpaperconnection. We’ll be sending out some free assorted paper sampler packs to selected artists that inspire us with their works on and of paper! I’m thrilled to be the first artist-in-residence at Paper Connection! Paper explorations shown in these photos were created with some of the “drop” (left over from paper cut for collections and samples) or some of our smaller pre-cut sample papers: from color kozo collage (color studies in homage to Josef Albers), cyanotype photogram experiments on kozo paper, like joomchi with hanji, to digital printing on Indian handmade paper. The diversity of color, weight and texture of a paper from all over the world offers endless points of inspiration for any creative practice - from simple graphite drawing on kozo paper, chine collé on gampi paper, collage with lokta paper, to origata/origami with yuzen paper! I’m grateful for already learning so much here at the Paper Connection and looking forward to sharing more of my creative explorations using these specialty papers…. Next post will be a year-long AIR recap as well as some words about an awesome Kozo Collage class I taught with Paper Connection… -Lisa Perez, Artist in Residence