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Curating WITH PAPER September 12 2022

I recently curated a gallery group exhibit gallery at Pawtucket Arts Collaborative. Show Title: WITH PAPER, A PAC Gallery Pop-up, showcased works by Bayda Asbridge, Suzi Ballenger, Justine Chang, and myself, Lauren Pearlman Sugita. All 4 participating artists work with paper in different ways with overlaps. The basis, of course, was how we all work with, live with, and communicate with paper.
Lauren Pearlman Sugita, couching, SMFA
handmade paper A Book of Spinach & Feta
handmade flax paper Mollusks from Mars
handmade cotton paper, Laurelai Designs Woven Vines
Putting together such a quick turn-around event like this, definitely challenged my "juggling" skills. I was super-focused and in an abbreviated amount of time, it came together! The collaboration afforded me the opportunity to connect and deepen relationships with three super-talented artists, mainly by spending intimate time with their work. It was interesting for me that the act of curation, allowed me to know each one in a new way (including myself!). As I continually seek community, the experience provided a new path for connectivity and bonds. As WITH PAPER, the gallery show, assembled in just a few days, a "community" was formed. Those connections were the most rewarding gift of WITH PAPER. I requested each of the other 3 artists to send in a comment subsequent to the show.
Bayda Asbridge mixed media Our Village
BAYDA ASBRIDGE writes: I was invited by Lauren Pearlman Sugita from Paper Connection to participate in this pop-up exhibit WITH PAPER at the Pawtucket Arts Collaborative. It was short notice but still, Lauren worked extremely hard to put a very professional show together with our group while maintaining her business during the day. I was incredibly grateful to be invited and to be part of this beautiful exhibit because it gave me a deadline to finish a paper tapestry "San Diego on My Mind", an opportunity to bond with other artists, and the opportunity to reach a wider audience.
Bayda Asbridge mixed media fiber, paper, weaving San Diego on My Mind
Bayda Asbridge mixed media fiber, paper, weaving Blue Lagoon by Bayda Asbridge
SUZI BALLENGER writes: Thank you Lauren for your curatorial wisdom and vision. WITH PAPER became an opportunity to work through my thoughts on the series “To Be of Use”. These works reflect on the interconnection of vitality/detritus, growth/sediment, and need/sacrifice, an exciting exploration worth further investigation. Meeting the other artists was an honor. The work chosen for this exhibit made me feel like I was part of a common understanding and passion.
Suzi Ballenger handmade paper, onion skin To Be of Use
Suzi Ballenger handmade abaca paper, reed, porcupine quills I realized I was the one who was trapped. I just couldn’t swallow another fly!
Suzi Ballenger handmade abaca, hemp Suggestive Freedoms
JUSTINE CHANG writes: The show came together beautifully, and I was honored to be a part. As someone who is new to handmade paper, I’ve been constantly surprised by the generosity of other artists working with paper, including Lauren, Suzi, and Bayda. It was such a meaningful experience, to meet the artists, and to see the response of people who came to view the work. All of this confirms for me, that working with paper is an important way to reconnect with my body, my heritage, and nature.
Justine Chang photography on Korean paper. hanji Series: Margins
Justine Chang photography on Korean paper. hanji Series: Margins

Cyanotypes - Artist Sarah Dunn Talks Accessible Art-making August 11 2022

There are many terrifying things about finishing college. Many graduates are concerned with entering the real-world market. For me, it was entering a world without 24/7 print shop access. What was I to do without acid baths, graining sinks, pressure washers, and printing presses? Answer: Cyanotype. I have worked in most printmaking methods, but cyanotype hadn't piqued my interest. What can I say? I am not a blue person. The realization that there was an accessible method and materials that didn't require traditional makers spaces was evolutionary. All I needed was a dark room and a sunny day. Cyanotypes were invented in the 1840s by astronomer and chemist John Federick William Herschel. Anna Atkins, a trained botanist, popularized the technique by establishing this photographic process as an accurate alternative to scientific illustration. One of the earliest examples is her book, Photographs of British Algae: Cyanotype Impressions. Cyanotypes are defined as, irreproducible prints, with white silhouettes on Prussian blue grounds. A mixture of equal parts ferric ammonium citrate and potassium ferricyanide is applied in a low-light environment. Jacquard makes an easy-to-use kit found at most art retailers. The importance of coating your paper evenly and in a low-light environment will ensure further success. A foam brush gets an even layer and clean margins. However, I love the look of using a brush and creating wispy margins. After coating, the paper is left to dry in your 'darkened room.' An actual dark room with red light is ideal. However, you can use a low-lit room with covered windows. I usually put them in the bathtub. Works like a charm.
Laying in the sun
Papers, most recently tried: Natural Kozo Medium Weight M-0202 White Kozo Heavyweight G-0001 Green Tea Flecks on Green G-0016 Mitsumata Unryu Heavy Weight Brushed Surface G-0006 Masa Soft White I-MM or I-MMLg Now the fun part. Exposure! Artists traditionally arrange their compositions in a dark room. If you lack bat vision, move into a more lit area as long as your coated paper remains out of direct sunlight - the brighter the area, the faster you'll need to work. The first time I tried making cyanotypes, I arranged my entire composition outside in direct sunlight. It felt like a fast-paced game show. Not exactly a relaxing experience. However, the prints worked due to my lightning speed. I suggest placing your coated paper on a sheet of plexiglass, firm paper, or cardboard before arranging your composition. This will make transferring your piece into the sunlight easier. Arrange objects you'd like exposed, remembering that cyanotypes are silhouettes of objects. If you place a smaller leaf inside a large leaf, the larger leaf will only be exposed. The larger consumes the smaller leaf. After completing your composition, place a sheet of clear glass, plexiglass, or acetate on top to weigh down the objects. Your sandwiched cardboard, paper, and Plexi are ready to move outside into direct sunlight. I strongly recommend using rocks or other paperweights to hold down your work if you use acetate instead of glass or plexiglass. The wind can and will blow everything away. It’s embarrassing chasing after your artwork in the parking lot while your neighbors watch. Ask me how I know.
Stopping the process with a water bath
Once the cyanotype turns a bronzy-brown color, it is ready to be washed out. Carry the entire sandwich out of direct sunlight. Use cool water to wash the print. Many artists prefer to do this in some kind of low vat or tub, continuously agitating the paper by rocking the vat back and forth or using their hands. The print is thoroughly washed out when the ground has turned blue, and the silhouettes lighten. While it dries, the Prussian blue grows deeper in color.
Dry version on the left, the wet version on the right
Since the 1840s, this is how traditional cyanotypes were made. However, as with any medium, artists have pushed boundaries. My personal favorite is wet cyanotypes. This technique adds manipulators such as herbs, salt, pepper, coffee grounds, and lemon juice while the paper is still wet with chemistry, creating multiple colors and variations. Move sandwiched piece (while wet) into the sun to finish exposure. The results have a more painterly appearance, with the overall look of being hand-dyed. This method gives a more botanical or nature-inspired feel.
Salt and soap bubbles
Amendments added to your wet work create texture and color: Salt makes small spots or an acid-dye effect. Lemon juice produces large spots. Foamy soap gives a subtle washy effect, changing the deep blue background to earthy green. Kitchen items such as turmeric, paprika, tea, and coffee can be sprinkled to create more color variations. Experiment with any and everything! Effects will vary. The rest of the wet process is similar to the traditional dry cyanotype except for exposure time. Dry cyanotypes take 5-30 minutes, determined by sun conditions. Wet cyanotypes may take up to 24 hours. Generally, the longer you can leave exposed to the sun, the better. I typically leave mine for two hours in full sun. I recently taught a workshop at Paper Connection with students waiting as little as 30 minutes before washing their prints. Their pieces turned out beautifully. Currently, I am using wet cyanotypes to re-panel lampshades I thrifted. The light shining through really emphasizes the subtleties in texture and color. Overall, I love the accessibility cyanotypes give my artistic practice. I enjoy making simply for the joy it brings me. What will you make with cyanotypes? I would love to see. Stay tuned for more workshops through Paper Connection. Many thanks to Lauren Pearlman for helping with photography.
Sarah Dunn - Artist-in-residence Instagram@sarah.is.dunn sarahdunnstudio.com
Note: In the next blog post, we'll do a deeper dive into papers that work well with cyanotypes. Check out our Monthly Subscription Service and Shop Paper Pastiche! our papers help tell your story - want more? http://paperconnection.com/news/

PD Packard on Creative Freedom June 23 2022

Artist, PD Packard Photo Credit: Faye Arranz
We checked in with PD Packard. How did your creative journey bring you to this place? I’ve always had a natural love of color. When growing up in Washington, D.C., and trying to determine how I would make an income with this love of color, I believed that going to a university would be the answer. I began studying fashion design at Parsons School of Design in NYC. Through an exchange program, I applied for and was awarded a full scholarship to Saint Martin’s School of Art (aka Central Saint Martin’s), in London, England. There I obtained a BFA in Fashion and Textile Design. At Saint Martin’s I was given a lot of creative freedom, something that had been missing at Parsons. Most of my days at Saint Martin’s were spent working in the textile department dyeing and printing fabrics, and then executing many self-indulgent, crazy-butt ideas for clothing and accessories that weren’t viewed as very commercial by my teachers. It was a wonderful foundation and even today experimenting without restraints is a very important part of developing any of my ideas, helping me discern and refine each step towards completion.
Travel & Cosmetic Bags, designed under the PD Packard Label Medium: 100% Cotton Size: Various Date: 1986 - 1996
When I returned to the states in the late 80s, I began designing packaging, POP displays, and original textile and surface designs primarily for the cosmetic industry in NYC. Under my own label, PD Packard, I also designed and produced exclusive lines of travel and cosmetic bags for the department stores Barneys New York & Japan, Neiman Marcus, Henri Bendel, and Bergdorf Goodman that were sold nationally and internationally. There’s real money to be made in production. The problem was that I felt I was always squeezed like a lemon, asked to produce cheaper, faster, and to make it happen yesterday. I grew to dislike the work and one day decided to stop. Many of the principles in printmaking are similar to fabric and surface design making an easy and natural transition for me into fine art printmaking in 2009. How would you define your art and what is the meaning behind your work? I am called a Multimedia Artist, using printmaking in combination with different medias and techniques; photography, animation, and painting to share my love for color, and pattern. My work is committed to bringing attention to the power that Nature has to influence our perception of art and design. I am not the expressor, I am the expression. When I begin a project, I try to let go of my ego and be open and receptive to inspiration. In the essay, “The Untroubled Mind" (1972), the painter/author Agnes Martin, speaks of art as beauty, and states that this beauty is unattached, that it’s in your Mind; it’s inspirational. I believe that this inspiration is free and available to all, beyond person, place, or thing; it’s unconditional Love. Unconditional Love means that I will remain committed to my work even if the condition seems unfavorable. Regardless of the circumstance or outcome, I am self-motivated to continue my work because of this unconditional Love. Can you describe the importance of paper (or other mediums) in your work, what type of paper (medium) you use most, and why?
Printed Decorative Papers
Medium: Relief printmaking method, M-0207 Kozo White Text Weight with Sizing-56gsm and M-0202 Natural Kozo Medium Weight-44gsm.
Size: 25” height x 37” width
Dates: Various
The paper I use is basically Kozo x Kozo = Kozo. Initially, when creating my artwork, I used mostly papers made from cotton. Around 2010, I met the NYC-based Japanese artist, Yasuyo Tanaka, while taking a class on Japanese Bookbinding with her at the Manhattan Graphics Center. I noted how wonderful the collection of Japanese Kozo papers that Yasuyo used, and she shared Paper Connection as her source. Since then, I’ve been using Paper Connection’s fine art papers, specifically whites, and naturals, in my work. My foundation is painting. I love the depth of color I can achieve through layering when working in watercolors. In 2009 I began using the Akua Intaglio Printmaking Inks trying to translate this layered, watercolor effect into printmaking but found my prints became too saturated with ink. A turning point came in 2015 when from a brief demonstration on the use of Akua Liquid Pigments by the artist and Akua Inks inventor, Susan Rostow, I was inspired to experiment. A medium entirely new to my printmaking process, I discovered that with the Akua Liquid Pigments I could print almost unlimited sheer layers of color. An absolute necessity in creating this method of decorative paper is the use of Japanese Kozo paper, or in English, mulberry paper. Kozo is highly absorbent and has long fibers that give the paper strength and durability to withstand multiple layers of ink. Two Paper Connection papers that work well for this method are M-0207 Kozo White Text Weight with Sizing-56gsm, and M-0202 Natural Kozo Medium Weight-44gsm. With this medium, I’ve developed a technique for creating printed decorative papers that I use in almost every aspect of my work; book art, sculpture, installation, animation, and much more. Printed Decorative Papers are all about the color story. To really experience the full extent of this process, you start by committing to a color story with a minimum of 5 or more different colors. The more colors you use, the better the effect so it’s important to be courageous and keep applying layers. I take dried flowers and leaves I’ve harvested from my garden or collected off the streets of NYC and lay them in a pattern of my desire on top of a Plexi printmaking plate that has been coated with Akua Liquid Pigment. During the printing process, I try to be open to - rethink, adapt, or change, if something is not moving as planned. The finished print usually ends up with 15+ layers of different colors with a beautiful, layered effect, somewhat like watercolor. To know more about my technique for Printing Decorative Papers with Akua Inks, you can find the video on the Akua Printshop Channel here > https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jGZYtCZ4ul4 Are there papers from Paper Connection that you can speak about/provide insights, elaborations, process, and/or integrity of quality? Two projects of mine that I believe showcase the strength, diversity, and beauty of the Japanese Kozo paper from Paper Connection are OUTSHINE fear and Armour Clad In LOVE. On a practical note, I’ve learned from Paper Connection’s owner, Lauren Pearlman Sugita, that Kozo is an environmentally friendly traditional Japanese papermaking product. Because the Kozo bush is a renewable shrub that’s harvested annually, the plants will regenerate continually for many years. OUTSHINE fear is a series of works that combine the very popular alternative photographic method cyanotype and laser-cut Plexi plates created from computer-generated designs.
OUTSHINE fear, Watch Thought, NO fear
Medium: Gold Akua Intaglio Ink on Laser cut Plexi printing plates,
Aiko’s AI-232 Sakamoto Natural LW Kozo paper, combined with
alternative photographic method cyanotype.
Size: 18” height x 24” width
Date: August 2020
The cyanotype photos were developed on Aiko’s AI-232 Sakamoto Natural LW. The Sakamoto paper works brilliantly when developing and exposing the image onto the paper achieving beautiful, clear images. Because of the strength of the paper, it’s possible to expose or tone the image many times without the paper breaking down. Unfortunately, the papers are no longer being produced. This project was based on the prompt: Question: How does one encourage and motivate others when opportunity appears to be limited? Answer: LOVE MORE for every hate. I am a parent and an educator living and working in NYC. On March 22, 2020, my twin 17 years old daughters were informed that they would not be returning to their high school, three months shy of their graduation. They were attending a NYC performance & art high school, both in the visual arts program. Art is social, so when the school began teaching remotely many of the students did not show up to the online classes. Without the use of the school’s studio space, art supplies, and direct guidance from teachers and their peers, many students found it difficult to work on their own. Some students became despondent and didn’t complete their work. Through the years I've been taking photos of my children and using them as my muse. It’s a great working relationship because they’re very trusting and not concerned about how they look in the final artwork. It’s very liberating for me as an artist.

For reference, you can find the original post for OUTSHINE fear here: https://www.pdpackardlovemore.com/post/outshine-fear

Discord Is The Absence of Truth Medium: Gold Akua Intaglio Ink on Laser cut Plexi printing plates, Aiko’s AI-232 Sakamoto Natural LW Kozo paper, combined with alternative photographic method cyanotype. Size: 18” height x 12” width Date: August 2020 SOUL AWARENESS NOT sense awareness Medium: Gold Akua Intaglio Ink on Laser cut Plexi printing plates, Aiko’s AI-232 Sakamoto Natural LW Kozo paper, combined with alternative photographic method cyanotype. Size: 18” height x 12” width Date: August 2020
The Photographic Process for SOUL AWARENESS NOT sense awareness
Top Right Image: Original Image
Top Left Image: Inverted Transparency (negative) Use to Expose Print
Bottom Right Image: Chemical Reaction to Sensitized (coated with cyanotype formula) Sakamoto Kozo Paper Exposed to Sun.
Bottom Left Image: Final Print After Toned in Borax Bath
unclasp the hold on thought: think ANEW Medium: Gold Akua Intaglio Ink on Laser cut Plexi printing plates, Aiko’s AI-232 Sakamoto Natural LW Kozo paper, combined with alternative photographic method cyanotype. Size: 18” height x 12” width Date: August 2020 Process for unclasp the hold on thought: think ANEW Left Image: Computer Generated Artwork for Printing Plate Right Image: Akua Intaglio Metallic Gold Inked Laser Cut Plexi Printmaking Plate Life living Love loving Soul feeling Mind knowing Medium: Gold Akua Intaglio Ink on Laser cut Plexi printing plates, Aiko’s AI-232 Sakamoto Natural LW Kozo paper, combined with alternative photographic method cyanotype. Size: 18” height x 12” width Date: August 2020 Armour Clad in LOVE: quarantine in NYC During the end of the March 2020 quarantine in NYC, I took early morning walks through nearby Prospect Park, in Brooklyn, NY, collecting tree parts to use as content for the short films I create. With skills from my years designing in the fashion industry, I created a suit using the printing plates from OUTSHINE fear and my printed decorative papers on Japanese Kozo paper. The Kozo paper is so strong and resilient that the suit can actually be worn. The suit represents the idea of our earth, and all of humanity as being armour clad, and protected by LOVE.
Armour Clad in LOVE
Medium: Decorative paper & Akua Intaglio Ink on Laser
cut Plexi printing plates, M-0207 Kozo White Text Weight
with Sizing-56gsm.
Size: 72” height x 50” width, assembled
Date: April 2020
Armour Clad in LOVE, jacket stitch detail
Medium: Decorative paper & Akua Intaglio Ink on Laser
cut Plexi printing plates, M-0207 Kozo White Text Weight
with Sizing-56gsm.
Size: 72” height x 50” width, assembled
Date: April 2020
Armour Clad in LOVE, pant stitch detail
Medium: Decorative paper & Akua Intaglio Ink on Laser
cut Plexi printing plates, M-0207 Kozo White Text Weight
with Sizing-56gsm.
Size: 72” height x 50” width, assembled
Date: April 2020
Ground Print for Armour Clad in LOVE
Medium: A ground layer was created using my Printed Decorative
paper method, using dried plants as a stencil together with printing
multiple layers of plates inked with the transparent-like Akua Liquid
Pigments on M-0207 Kozo White Text Weight with Sizing-56gsm.
Size: 25” height x 37” width
Date: April 2020
Inked laser-cut Plexi printing plate used for
Armour Clad in LOVE
Medium: The final top layer was printed with the Akua Intaglio
Inks using laser-cut Plexi printing plates. The sheen on the print
was created by adding silver metallic intaglio ink to ultramarine
blue and phthalo blue. The original designs for the laser-cut plates were computer-generated.
Size: 25” height x 37” width
Date: April 2020
For reference, you can find the original post here: https://www.pdpackardlovemore.com/post/armour-clad-in-love-quarantine-in-nyc What influences inspire you and why? In the book, Saul Bass A Life in Film & Design, he describes the ideal trademark as “thinking made visible.” That’s a principle I strive to express in my artwork. I’ve always loved bold graphics, with self-similar images and mathematical order. In the late 80s, a friend took me to hear a lecture on graphic design given at FIT (Fashion Institute of Technology), in NYC. I had no idea who the guest speaker was, and in my naive mind, he looked like some regular, middle-aged man wearing a suit and heavy, black-rimmed glasses. He was introduced as Saul Bass, the American graphic designer, and filmmaker. From the start, I was incredibly impressed with his work especially when he showed his title sequences he had created for many well-known movies, like The Pink Panther and for films by Alfred Hitchcock. For Hitchcock’s movies, North by Northwest, Vertigo, and Psycho, Bass invented this type of kinetic typography in his title sequences that I love. Bass was also a prolific trademark or logo designer, and many of his logos are still in use today, showing the longevity and strength of his work. Longevity and strength are traits that I greatly admire in anyone's work. Graphics and film have made a big, inspirational impact on me as a designer and visual artist. In 2018, I began creating short films, or vignettes. I use printmaking in combination with Nature to create visual poetry that shares my thirst for color, nature, and unconditional LOVE, not conditional romance. To bring my artwork to life I interlace and overlay live-action video with flat animation mediums in combination with music that flow from one scene to the next. My most recent short film project was organized by the artist pair, Phyllis and Victor Merriam of the thepostdigitalprintmakers, and Susan Rostow of Akua Inks. I was invited to create an original animation for PRINTFLIX, a film screening featuring ten artists that use printmaking in combination with animation. The screening was held during the SGC International MakerReady Virtual Event Saturday, April 10, 2021, showcasing the Armour Clad in LOVE suit made with papers sourced from Paper Connection. Short Film, Armour Clad in LOVE: Paper Connection papers used: Aiko’s AI-232 Sakamoto Natural LW, Natural Kozo Medium Weight-44gsm M-0202, and Kozo paper G-0008. Mediums: Drypoint etching, Relief printmaking, laser-cut printmaking plates, and cyanotype. View Here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R4Fo-u4w5_0 If you could converse with any artist present/past, who would it be and what would you ask? Due credit goes to Kojiro Ikegami, one of Japan’s leading professional bookbinders. Many years ago, I bought his book titled, Japanese Book-binding, Instructions from a Master Craftsman. Although I believe he is no longer living, I would love to have had the opportunity to thank him for generously sharing instructions for making major, historically important styles of Japanese binding and book cases. I find that when you’re focused on creating the most beautiful artwork, or in his case, binding books, most of your time is spent resolving technical problems that might come up when executing a piece. It takes a lot of humility to freely share your knowledge with others when you’ve spent a lifetime committed to perfecting your skills. I am so grateful that I have access to his easy-to-use book-binding instructions and have been able to expand his principles into box art, custom-framed artwork, freestanding walls, and so much more. I can only imagine how special the opportunity was to train under this master. Do you have any upcoming shows?
Artist, PD Packard working in her Brooklyn, NY studio. Photo Credit: Faye Arranz
I am currently part of the traveling exhibition called: CONNECT: Small Prints by Members of The Boston Printmakers 2021 – 2023 This small print show was developed in partnership with the venerable Providence Art Club in Rhode Island to celebrate The Boston Printmakers upcoming 75th anniversary in 2023. Prompted by the theme of “communication,” with a suggested image size of a cell phone, or no larger than 8”x10”, members of the Boston Printmakers were asked to create prints about “messaging,” “news,” or content they wanted to “post." Upcoming Exhibition Dates: October 2022: Oregon Society of Artists, Portland OR Dates TBA March 5, 2023 – April 5, 2023: Center for Contemporary Printmaking Share your current projects: Since March 2022 I’ve been working with the American composer, songwriter, and producer Paul Brill on a commission to create the artwork for his latest 12” vinyl record, The Cost of Believing, and for "45" or 7-inch vinyl singles scheduled to debut in October 2022. Paul gave me the freedom to create what I want, which is an artist’s dream. I am truly grateful for this commission. Initially, it was a challenge because there were practically no rules and infinite directions in which I could go. I’ve listened to his music several times during the process of recording the album, but my focus was on interpreting his lyrics visionally for the album cover in the most beautiful, collaborative way. On June 9th I presented the first step of the project, a body of original artwork for the album cover that consisted of sixteen unique pieces. Using the techniques of cyanotype, decorative papers, and laser-cut printing plates all the original artwork was created on Aiko's Sakamoto Heavyweight-AI-224B, Kozoshi Natural Extra Heavyweight-M-0206-#3-80gsm and Kozo White Text Weight with Sizing-56gsm M-0207. Here’s a selection of the recently presented artwork for the album covers.
God Loves You the Most
Medium: Alternative photographic method
cyanotype on Aiko's Sakamoto Heavyweight-AI-224B
Size: 12.5” height x 12.5” width
Date: June 2022
Unblunted Mind
Medium: Alternative photographic method
cyanotype on Aiko's Sakamoto Heavyweight-AI-224B
Size: 12.5” height x 12.5” width
Date: June 2022
The Promise of Light
Medium: Computer-designed laser-cut Plexi printing plate, decorative papers, on Kozoshi Natural Extra Heavyweight-M-0206-#3-80gsm
Size: 24” height x 18” width
Date: June 2022
The Cost of Believing
Medium: Computer-designed laser-cut Plexi
printing plate, decorative papers, on Kozoshi
Natural Extra Heavyweight M-0206-#3-80gsm
Size: 12.5” height x 12.5” width
Date: June 2022
PD Packard Contact Email pdpackard@pdpackard.com Website www.pdpackard.com
Fricka Jones - Artist, Designer, Imagineer, Writer, Editor, Collaborator, Support maricooh@gmail.com patriciajones.crevado.com
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SUSTAINABLE PAPER+CRAFT on Ancestral Land in Kansas City, MO April 04 2022


KelsKelsey Pikeey Pike, papermaker, printmaker, and art teacher in Kansas City, Missouri, creates fine handmade papers and products using varied materials that may include rags, raw plant fibers, filaments, threads, gold leaf, and whatever she can get her hands on. Her aesthetics are pure magic. “I have been in love with the obscure and tedious art form of hand papermaking since . . . art school.” In 2021, Pike aimed more of her time making single-run handmade papers. While white papers were her bread and butter, she longed for variety, experimentation, and collaboration with fellow artists/designers. Kelsey’s Monthly Paper Parcel was born with curated and unique colorways offered as a cyclic subscription.
Kelsey Making Paper at Cherry Pit Collective Kelsey Making Paper at Cherry Pit Collective
“. . . the sound of the water, the repetitive motions, the solitude – they put me in a meditative space.”
Monthly Paper Parcel Examples Monthly Paper Parcel Examples
Wet-process, two-sided, de-bossed or gradient sheets, and papers with varietal inclusions such as gold leaf, threads, or fabrics. Each month subscribers receive a package perfect for artists, imagineers, and the creatively curious. “Good craft is important to me, and I am continuously studying, practicing, and learning to make the best paper.” Cherry Pit Collective Kansas City MO Kelsey Pike also co-founded Cherry Pit Collective, a communal studio space for artists, makers, and creatives, where the work and vision of women are emphasized and celebrated. Kelsey is the cornerstone in creating an environment of members who work, support, and promote each other through a shared workspace and creative communing. Cherry Pit Collective hosts monthly programs that include classes and events for skill sharing within the community, fostering collaboration over competition. All are welcome, but female-identifying artists and members of other marginalized communities take priority. ​Cherry Pit Collective resides on ancestral land belonging to the people of Kiikaapo (Kikapoo), Wazhazhe Mazhá (Osage), Kaw (Kansa), and Očhéthi Šakówin (Sioux). “We honor with gratitude the land itself and the people who have and continue to steward it.” You can locate Kelsey and her gorgeous papers and products through: Kelsey@Sustainablepapercraft.com Sustainable Paper+Craft Cherry Pit Collective Instagram Facebook Etsy
Kelsey and Lauren at Cherry Pit Collective Kelsey and Lauren at Cherry Pit Collective

fricka - artist not in residence

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The Lotus Position November 16 2021


Using Varietal Papers with Different Effects
Softly Spoken using PCI Paper
9 Wonderful Templates
There is little as soothing as folded paper art. The repetitive motion, sharp and crisp lines - fold, flip, fold, flip. The rhythm is comforting, hypnotic. I chose one of 9 templates from Brother Industries, their Lotus Flower. I used Brother's straightforward tutorial and selected papers that could handle multiple folds. The smaller I went, the thinner and more resilient the paper. Great choices from Paper Connection include the Yuzen paper line or Katazome, for starters. Give Itajimishi a go or try Lokta. Patterned, embedded, crinkled, solid, or semi-translucent, experimenting and outcomes trigger different appeals. I overprinted using my Canon PRO-100, which created a whole other feel. Note: Not all printers can handle heavier or fragile papers. My Canon PRO-100 has served me well. If I have a concerning substrate, such as felted paper, I back the material with a full-size/removable adhesive label paper from Dennison or Staples. Removable adhesive labels keep the paper stable as it goes through the printer.

“Make it your own.”


Lovely notes or perhaps beautiful hanging objects. Felted flowers, table placards, or an added adornment to create a moment of peace. Thank you Brother!

our papers help tell your story

fricka - artist in residence - our papers help tell your story

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Holey Smoke! Rakusui M-0803 February 28 2019

https://youtu.be/mQ6lAADq35k


Artist of the Month: Lisa Abbatomarco; Mixed Media Sculpture January 28 2016

This month we turn to a local artist who not only uses handmade paper as a material in her mixed media sculptures, but also uses it to teach young ones to respect the environment and become active participants in caring for it. Meet Lisa Abbatomarco and her unique approach to handmade paper. She has been an integral part of the Urban Pond Procession for the past 3 years. Last year Lisa completed a residency with the group in promoting the next generation to learn lantern making, creating puppets, all the while cherishing our precious planet. PCI: Thank you so much for doing this interview, Lisa. Please describe what you do and how paper plays an intrinsic role in your artwork. LA: I work with fiber arts, collage, sculpture, papier maché, I like to call it a “construction”, a combination of industrial materials, felt, wire, and paper. I’m doing construction, combining elements and textures that I like, whether in 2D or 3D form, it constantly evolves. I do a lot with kids, based in sculpture, puppetry, on an outdoor scale involving projects that bring awareness to various issues, like community, nature, and environmental concerns. PCI: How has paper inspired you with such a wide choice of materials, especially for sculpture? LA: I have always been interested in paper. I’m always the one saving the wrapping paper, from different objects, even candy wrappers. This has evolved to papier maché, with that top surface, top layer, turning into lanterns, puppets. PCI: The Urban Pond Procession, based in Providence, cultivates awareness of local nature paths and waterways in famous Roger Williams Park by having children work on various art projects, culminating in the procession in the areas around Mashapaug Pond and Roger Williams Park. How do your lanterns and puppets configure in this annual event? LA: I collaborate with a friend who is a story-teller, and the story telling culminates with a procession of lanterns and puppets. The forms, which can be puppets, characters, using reed as an overhead frame, and handmade paper, light up at night. The kids play with the paper, with the concept of creating lanterns-big or small-as imagery of bringing light, celebrating the night. LA: Last year, 3 different residencies and 3 different schools all came together to Urban Pond Procession. A personal awareness is involved, as there are neighborhoods surrounding the pond, and local wild life. PCI: How often do you decide to use paper for the puppets and lanterns? LA: I kind of like to say it is “structured improvisation”. Sometimes it depends on the length of the workshop. It can be simple to extensive. I tend to work with a theme in mind. For example, we’re going to work with Calder. His free form helps me to ask, “How many ways can I make a lantern?” The annual event of the Pond Procession celebrates the pond, and we are constantly deepening the process. To celebrate the night, we revolve around the idea of constellations. The process is constantly deepening. PCI: How were you introduced to Paper Connection? How have our papers enhanced your method or approach? LA: I knew an old friend, Joanne, who knew you. I go to Paper Connection without a goal, because there are so many pretty things. Like we’re doing turtles, colorful fish, what kind of papers can I use? It’s a good thing you don’t let us go in the back! PCI: Being in our paper warehouse is exactly like being a kid in a candy shop, that's why non-staff are not allowed in the back; it's way too tempting. :) Is it love at first sight when you see a particular paper? Does the idea come first and then you decide on what you will use, or do you choose the paper first, knowing that it will yield the results you desire? LA: Now that I have been there, (to the warehouse), I know which papers will work. I am usually on a budget, so I know, okay, I can look at these papers. For my own personal project, I will look at the paper and ask, what’s speaking to me? It’s very intuitive for me, and I get really excited about pattern. One time when you brought back a paper hat from Japan, and folded wallets, it got me very excited. These beautiful objects made me want to make paper. PCI: How are you able to explain the importance of handmade paper to your younger students? LA: What I like to do is explain how the papers are made so they have more of an appreciation for it. This really should be brought to their attention. I do tell them how much it costs, and $4 per sheet is shocking to them. But it would be a great thing to have them understand the concept of bringing old art forms back that require the hand to make them. Some of it is preservation. There’s a history to it, and all of that fits into what I teach. It doesn’t just appear. There is a process of getting a nice material before turning it into a nice project. What I like about Paper Connection is that somebody’s daily livelihood is affected. They spend their day making this. All of the work uses recycled and sustainable materials. So with the paper, we save scraps. We always have a scrap box, cut out what we want, and we collect sticks found in the woods, recycled wire. I find it easier to pull from things that already exist. PCI: So at the same time, you are inculcating the principle of being resourceful, and responsible to the children you teach. How do they react to the paper? LA: Like a candy store! It’s really fun. When I unroll colorful papers, they dive into it. It’s like a jewel. They gasp. The same goes for adults, actually. And I have to choose vibrant colors. I love the gorgeous white, elegant papers, but kids respond to colors. paper floats, sculpture, mixed media, environmental awareness, urban waters PCI: What challenges exist in teaching novices how to work with specialty papers? LA: I hear a lot of “I’m not good at putting the paper on this…or that…” but I ask, “Have you ever done it before?” I have to say, let yourself be new. Be the baby at something. You don’t know until you do it the next time. If the paper gets wrinkly, you will love the wrinkles. You work with the accidents. PCI: What advice would you give to someone who is following in your footsteps? LA: Give yourself room to explore. It’s very important. There’s a misunderstanding that you pick something up and get it right the first time, at any age. Kids can be quick to say, “I’m not good at gluing!” But I ask them, “Well, how often do you glue?” PCI: And what about the use of handmade paper for lanterns and puppets? LA: Notice the weight, the thickness. I’m particular about weights. For lanterns, I hold the paper up to the light, move it around. Perhaps it works for this form but not enough light goes through it, for example. You have to use the right tools for the job so you get the most out of the material. Allow the material to show you what you can do with it. Paper is a tactile thing. Explore it and take the time to be with it. Let your senses guide you. PCI: Which artist has inspired you? LA: Louise Nevelson, a sculptor who works in printmaking, then wood and metal for large scale installations that are very geometric, monolithic at times. There’s an element of being indigenous, a quality at being present, that also carries in her person. PCI: Well, we see that your enthusiasm for teaching and your love for paper carries in yours, and is evident in our local Providence community. Thank you so much. Lisa will be teaching classes for both children and adults at Cutler Mills, in Warren, RI. For more on Lisa please visit: Lisa Abbatomarco Urban Pond Procession Hands on at 30 Cutler

Hanji Meets the World January 10 2015

Without a doubt Koreans are passionate about their kimchi and have successfully shown the rest of the world what they're boasting about. After attending a hanji-Korean paper- symposium entitled " A Thousand Years Old Hanji, Meets the World" , I have no doubt hanji too will soon be rolling off everyone's tongue! Korean kimchihanji symposium, ksdf, Korean Craft and Design Foundation Hanji is one of the finest papers in the world and certainly has many die-hard fans. It is, however, still less known in the global market compared to other Asian papers, i.e. Japanese (washi), Thai, or even Indian cotton papers. SO WHAT ARE SOME OF THE UNIQUE QUALITIES OF TRADITIONAL HANJI? webal -style sheet formation, no top locking screen, side to side dip, each sheet is double-couched in 2 opposite vertical directions, log rolled over couched sheet to elimate air bubbles and possibly helping release pulp from bamboo screen, and dochim: burnishing or hammering process which flattens, increases the density of paper. SAMSUNG CSC20141217_15213120141217_152128 Most of the attendees from foreign countries were book and paper conservators from places like the Tate Gallery in London, the Library of Congress in Washington, DC, and several other world-renowned institutions. In fact, the focus of the conference was the case for hanji to be used in repair and conservation. Once the special features of traditionally-made hanji were established over a few days, the conservators could better speculate in what particular repair applications hanji would be the right fit. The visit to observe actual papermaking, was one step towards understanding the material at hand and how it may behave with other materials. It was a rare occasion for conservators and papermakers to be sharing each others' daily jobs, but quite key for mutual of understanding between users and makers. For me, this emphasized the need for paper vendors like Paper Connection, as we are really "interpreters" of so many hundreds of paper needs and applications. At Paper Connection we feel it is our role to chronically disseminate and convey information into a paper vocabulary which the maker or manufacturer can relate to. Thanks to the prestigous members of the group, we had the privilege of being invited to a special viewing of the archives of Chonbuk National University, (one of the largest collection of antiquities in Korea); what incredible facilities. Two of my favorite book authors were part of my group: Ms. Aimee Lee and Mr. Nick Basbanes. IMG_5696 As you can imagine, the uses for hanji are endless, also true for almost any other well-made paper. Of course, Paper Connection is honored to carry hanji, both in an array of wonderful colors and neutral tones. Our hanji line is becoming quite popular, and now available here. In 2015, we will be stocking a thicker (96 gsm) hanji for printmaking or for backing, and a new thinner paper for basket cording. Check back here often! We were very lucky guests of the mayor of Jeonju, 20141218_115712where we were treated to feasts and traditional pansori music performance. Jeonju is considered the home of hanji and famous for the old-style architecture maintained in Hanok Village, IMG_9274of course, bibimbap, (rice bowl with meat), and the best pansori singer in the land.SAMSUNG CSC Many thanks again to The Korea Culture & Design Foundation for inviting me to the symposium. It was a great opportunity for me to learn more about hanji and its culture, its applications in conservation, and Korea, of course. A very special thanks to Ms. Bo Kyung Kim of Fides International and hanji artist Ms. Aimee Lee. SAMSUNG CSC Photographs provided by Paperwoman and KCDF.

Artist of the Month: Chuck Lathrop May 30 2014

Many moons ago, on a few occasions, we were lucky to have Chuck Lathrop visit Paper Connection. Back then, Chuck Lathrop lived in nearby Massachusetts and was part of the Monotype Guild of New England. Chuck exposed us to his brave approach to print on ANY surface, resulting in cutting-edge, bold and abstract prints, and we exposed him to traditional, Japanese, fine art papers or washi.

A few years ago, Chuck left our area to start his own studio in the sunny Southwest. Let's talk to Chuck and find out his opinion on paper, and the situation with his own handmade paper with dryer lint! Chuck is never shied away from trying new surfaces; coffee filters, and yes, even dryer lint paper.

coffee filters, beeswax, encaustic 74 Days in the Life of the Artist as Measured in Coffee Filters (used coffee filters, beeswax)
PCI: Please tell us about what you do. CL: Over the last 35 years my work has included printmaking, painting, mixed-media drawings and objects. The landscape has always had a huge influence on my work. At first it was through direct observation or photos, but today I work from within relying on memory, impressions, andemotion to create abstractions. Automatic mark-making is a huge part of my work as well. PCI: Who has inspired you? CL: My artistic influences are varied and too numerous to cite individually. Paul Cezanne and Robert Motherwell standout because my introduction to them coincided with huge changes in my style and motif. Today, there are many contemporary artists I draw inspiration from. PCI: What attracts you to working with paper? What do you like best about working with it? CL: Paper is probably one of the most versatile substrates available to artists and I have enjoyed pushing it to its limits.
West Mesa (Large) mixed media drawing on Kozo West Mesa (Large)
mixed media drawing on Kozo
PCI: How did you hear about our company? CL: I was introduced to Paper Connection International through the Monotype Guild of New England when Lauren Pearlman invited MGNE members to come to PCI’s office (showroom/warehouse) to talk about Japanese paper. PCI: How much knowledge did you have about Japanese papers before using ours? How did we help? CL: Until my introduction to PCI I had only used Western paper and my knowledge of Japanese paper was very limited. What my association with Lauren and PCI did for me was to expose me to a lot more possibilities regarding paper. PCI: What papers do you use of ours and for what process? What did you like about those papers that aided in your creative and/or technical process? CL: Kumohada Unryushi, (now a limited edition paper), and the various weights of Kozo are the ones I use the most frequently. I use the Kozo for monotypes and woodcuts. The Kumohada is utilized for collagraphs and painting. Some of the work on these papers I have mounted to panel and used as a basis for encaustic work. (Please see image below of When the Rhythm Sections Floats I Float Too, encaustic on reduction woodcut on panel).
Untitled, monoprint, using Kumohoda Unryushi paper Untitled, monoprint, using Kumohoda Unryushi paper
PCI: We are learning much about how our papers react to the encaustic process, and we'd love more of your feedback as we are novices to the application.
When the Rhythm Section Floats I Float Too encaustic on reduction woodcut on panel When the Rhythm Section Floats I Float Too
encaustic on reduction woodcut on panel
PCI: We're reminded of your visit and how laundry lint inspired you? CL: As I remember it I was learning how make paper with scraps of museum board, something of which I generally have a quite a bit of in the studio. In my research I ran across a reference to someone using dryer lint. Made sense to me since some Western papers were made from cotton rags hence term “rag paper”. I collected a bunch of lint from the dryer and one day when I was creating paper from museum board I threw some of the lint into the mix towards the end of the day’s session. Consequently the first sheet had a little paper pulp which yielded a light blue-gray and the last sheets had no paper pulp and came out a dark blue-gray. Though I still have some sheets of the paper (both from museum board and lint), I created at the time (the late 1990's), and still work with it on occasion, I found the paper was weak and easily tore when I didn’t want it to tear. Given that I now live the Southwest and water supply is always an issue, especially during the current drought we are in, and the fact that any kind of paper making takes a large amount of water, I probably won’t be making any more paper. PCI: We commend your awareness and responsible action. What is your experience as far as the strength of Japanese papers versus Western papers? CL: I prefer Western paper when I create paintings and mixed drawings, but for printmaking I prefer the Japanese papers. The Japanese papers don’t hold up well with my painting techniques and tend to fur-up when I draw on them. On the other hand I appreciate the quality of the Japanese papers when I’m making prints because there is a beautiful difference on how they receive the ink regardless of the strength. I don’t think Eastern paper is necessarily stronger than Western paper. A paper’s strength is largely dependent on the length of its fibers and what it is made of. I suspect some of the Eastern papers maybe stronger, but on the other hand, I would also guess some of the Western papers might be stronger. Other issues in this discussion are the questions: What will the paper used for? Will it be dampened or soaked? How absorbent is the paper dry or wet? PCI: Those are all very good questions that one should ask before purchasing paper. Our famous bonus question: If you could have a conversation with any artist present or past, who would it be? And would you talk about paper? CL: Yikes! There are so many I would like to have a conversation with that if I had the chance I would gather them around a table, if a large enough one could be found, just to talk about art. PCI: We'll provide the drinks! For more on Chuck Lathrop, please visit his website: www.chucklathrop.com. Chuck has recently established an online journal: www.nmartreview.com. We enjoyed the discussion, "On Serious Art." An upcoming show at the Downtown Contemporary Gallery, in Albuquerque, NM, will feature Chuck along with other printmakers. The show opens May 30th. If you are in the Albuquerque area then please go!

Artist of the Month: Joan Son March 11 2014

Her name evokes light, bright, warm light to me, and when you see her AMAZING works, (yes, that is all in CAPS for a reason), you will feel the same light too: paper transformed into creatures and works that come alive, and feel like they can float away, tempting you to put your fingers on them, feel the fiber that encases them, and even wear them. Meet the one and only Joan Son. I have had the privilege of giving 2 presentations with Joan Son and have been to her studio/residence several times in Houston, TX. Joan is a most gracious host. I cherish her warmth, kindness and years of friendship. Joan's glowing personality is truly manifested in her incredible talent of transforming paper into life-like sculptures. I hope you enjoy reading her perspective on paper as much as I did. PCI: What kind of artwork do you do? What or who has influenced and inspired you? JS: I am an artist working in the medium of paper based in the discipline of origami. For the past 21, years since my debut in the windows of Tiffany & Co. (Houston Galleria), I have devoted my career to the exploration of contemporary origami as fine art. My art has developed into finely crafted gift items for museum shops beginning at the Smithsonian in 1995; larger commissioned works for public and private venues and origami instruction nationally at Origami Conventions and in Houston at numerous educational facilities.
Bamboo Bamboo
PCI: What attracts you to working with paper? JS: I have always loved paper. My first love was designing paper doll dresses when I was 9 years old. So even my mother’s typing paper, lined school papers and tissue paper were attractive to me from very early on. I was totally intrigued making carnation like flowers with tissue paper. Even now when paper towels or napkins are on my grocery list I get excited wondering what patterns will be available. The commercial stuff is always changing. zooslide PCI: What do you like best about working with paper? I'm so curious as you have such a literal hands-on approach. JS: I like to say that paper is sculptable and forgiving. I love that about paper. It works into to all of my art pieces. It is much more durable that most folks think. PCI: I love the choice of words "forgiving" and "durable", it's almost like you are describing an amazing person. Please share how we met. JS: Your wonderful papers were represented by a commercial paper company (Clampitt Paper in Houston, TX). Their representative gave me your contact information and I have been passionate about your papers through all your evolutions. Since 1993 when I was working in a design firm, creating brochures, annual reports… and dabbling in my own creative process, I've been using them for everything from butterfly pins, collage works, to 8-foot tall paper Kimonos. PCI: Hopefully I've been evolving in a progressive way! And our papers reflect that. We are so happy that we have such a long-term solid relationship. It's reliable artists like yourself that help small business keep going. Did you have much knowledge about Japanese papers before using our line? JS: Very, very little… only Origami papers. PCI: In what ways did Paper Connection help navigate and perhaps inform you about Japanese paper? JS: In every way. You and I did a presentation together for Texas Art Supply here in Houston a few years ago. It was fascinating to see and hear about your travels in Asia and all the details and nuances of these exquisite papers. PCI: What papers do you use of ours and for what process? What did you like about those papers that aided in your creative and/or technical process? JS: Japanese Yuzen and Katazome paper are delicious, the Laurelai design papers, (see the Yoga Garden Robe), are fun and add a distinct personality to my designs. Looking through the catalog now I see there are so many more I still have to work with. I can hardly wait! I use your papers for many of my collage pieces, origami pieces and display.
paper sculpture Yoga Garden Robe by Joan Son, using several of the Laurelai papers
The Robe Series by Joan Son The Robe Series by Joan Son
PCI: What are some of the differences between our papers and others you have worked with? JS: Paper Connection always has the highest quality papers. PCI: Thank you so much! We really try to represent the best in handmade papers for those like yourself who truly appreciate them. Word game for you: fill in the blank, if you had to recommend a Paper Connection paper for a particular application: JS: I like Daitoku papers for their simple gold touches and natural beauty. Plus they have saved my life on two projects where I needed a very large sheet. These measure 37 x 72 inches. Perfect!
bookmarks, Laurelai Designs Laurelai bookmarks by Joan Son
money holders, business card holders Joan loves the Laurelai papers for many things, including bookmarks and wallets.
PCI: That paper is an oldie but goodie. Our famous bonus question: If you could have a conversation with any artist present or past, who would it be? And would you talk about paper? JS: PATTI SMITH. As I strive to make my work more deeply meaningful first to myself and that it be illuminating for others… this veteran rock and roll artist transcends all levels for me. She continues to inform our world with her tenderness and fury. And that she continues to evolve her art into all the years of her life. I think the conversation of paper would come up easily with Patti. I’m sure we would be tearing it or making it into butterflies right away. PCI: Yes! A musician! To say the least. A poet. You surely would. Can I dance along? Thank you Joan, for all you do for Paper Connection and the paper world. Check out this BIG NEWS for Joan! She opens a new body of work in Houston at the Jung Center Gallery in April 2014. We have included the Press Release:
looking back to move forward
a retrospective
a coming full circle
a beginning
When: Opening night Saturday April 5, 2014 Where: Jung Center Gallery 5200 Montrose, Houston, Texas 77006 Time: 5:00 to 7:00 On view through April 29, 2014 If you are in the Houston we highly recommend you attend. We wish we could be there ourselves.
Joan Son is an American artist who has devoted her career to the exploration of contemporary origami as fine art.
Now, through an Individual Artist Grant from the city of Houston through the Houston Arts Alliance, she shows a side of herself that has been hiding for 50 years.
TIME TRAVELERS brings her art full circle with paper doll dress designs she created when she was 9 years old. From these early paintings (that luckily her mother saved!) Joan is constructing full size paper dresses that will be displayed on lighted 6 foot plexiglass cylinders suggesting portals of time. Her story is inspired by this quote from Carl Jung...
“What did you do as a child that made the hours pass like minutes? Herein lies the key to your earthly pursuits.” Joan raised additional funds through her Kickstarter campaign and may be best known for her origami art that debuted in the windows of Tiffany & Co. in 1993. During the past 21 years she has developed her art as gift pieces for museum shops around the country beginning with the Smithsonian in 1995, been commissioned for larger art works both public and private and worked as an instructor of origami nationally and locally.
Much more of the story here on Kickstarter...
paper dresses
paper sculpture
Time Travelers. These 2 dresses use very common onion skin paper and letterhead papers on which Joan Son painted.
For more information on Joan Son, please visit her website: www.joanson.com
You may recognize her works:
Cliental:
Houston Museum of Natural Science
Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center
Menil Collection Artist Eye presentation
Neiman Marcus
Tiffany & Co. Houston Galleria
Ellen Noel Art Museum
Japan America Society Houston
Houston Center for Contemporary Craft
Houston Grand Opera
C. G. Jung Center Houston
National Gallery of Art Museum Shop
Smithsonian Museum Shop
Dallas Museum of Art Museum Shop
Art Institute of Chicago Museum Shop
St. Lukes Hospital
Memorial Hermann Hospital
Texas State University, through Art + Artisans Consultants
Veterans Administration Austin, through Art + Artisans Consultants