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Big News April 03 2023

Introducing the ART ANNEX! Lauren Pearlman Sugita, founder and director at Paper Connection has partnered with master weaver and artist Suzi Ballenger of RealFibers to realize a long-time dream. The new ART ANNEX, opening this month, is greater Rhode Island's only educational center for paper and fiber arts open to anyone in the community. The ART ANNEX is located in one of the largest, remaining mill complexes in the state, called HOPE ARTISTE VILLAGE. The building complex is on the National Register of Historic Places. The ART ANNEX is the largest educational center for paper, fiber and book arts of its kind between NYC and Portland, ME. The ART ANNEX is a local makers' space created for the greater community - welcoming folks of all ages and from all backgrounds. The ART ANNEX 's mission is to create a safe and accessible learning environment for traditional crafts, such as hand papermaking, hand weaving, natural dyeing, and book making.
First up at the ART ANNEX?
@Hope Artiste Village, 999 Main St. Unit #109 Pawtucket, RI.
April 8: Handweaving Basics 10am Sign up here 6 week course. April 14: Monoprints & Monotypes 5:30pm Sign up here 2 -hour workshop. April 15 & April 16: Lauren and Suzi will be in-house after 1pm both days, Drop In to make your own handmade hemp/(or some relative fiber) paper postcard/small sheet (suggested donation $5.00) during the Coastal Cultivator Classic sponsored by Mother Earth Wellness.
While we prepare the space for future workshops- mainly papermaking workshops ;), please join us at our Wednesday pm Drop-In Clinics during the Pawtucket Indoor Farmer's Market.
When: Beginning April 12, 2023, Wednesday nights, during the Indoor Farmer Market; next door at 1005 Main St.4:00-7:00 pm.. (Some Wednesdays in the future, Suzi may be selling vegetables too!) Where: The ART ANNEX 999 Main Street, Unit #109 Pawtucket, RI.
Donations are much appreciated!
Please stop by to check out the beautiful looms and gorgeous items for sale in our shop. Both Lauren and Suzi will be in-house to help troubleshoot your paper, fiber and book arts queries and quandaries. BONUS! we all get to meet each other- expanding our worlds.
MORE HOURS COMING SOON We'll be adding more open shop hours later in the spring and we'll definitely keep you posted. For all of you outside of the area, please visit our online shop. We truly hope you can visit the ART ANNEX someday soon!
for more information please email: paperexperts@paperconnection.com

Eastern Aesthetics Inspire Suzanne Lee March 31 2023

kimono fabric and baby dogwood
The early 1970s. Manhattan. Suzanne Lee started in the fashion industry. For nearly 25 years, she built design lines in Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, The Philippines, China, Thailand, and India. The travel awakened a cultural perspective and love of contemporary Asian art, calligraphy, antique Chinese furniture, and Japanese papers & gardens. By 1981 Suzanne's love of all things Asian created the Chi-lin art gallery, housed in a circa 1780 farmhouse in Laconia, New Hampshire. Initially, Chi-lin was an escape from the hectic New York day-to-day. The gallery later moved to its own building surrounded by a Japanese tea garden called Satori. Suzanne remembers with delight buying elegant tapestry-covered books & beautiful brushes in a Shanghai paper store - wandering the back streets of Tokyo to find the Washi Museum, spending hours in Kyoto temples surrounded by master paintings and gardens, and sitting with fiber artist Hisako Sikijima, in her tiny studio. In 2017 The Lakes Gallery at Chi-lin moved back to its farmhouse in Laconia, surrounded by the Asian-inspired art so very much loved. Winters are full of plans for upcoming shows and opportunities to visit and work with other artists and work on original designs. Exhibits run online and by appointment year-round. Varied hours, events, and poetry readings lace the late spring and continue through late fall. Note: On Suzanne's site, read the series about Process—the chronicled steps in creating art, the time, consideration, and work behind a creative piece. These are quick reads from several artists. Very enjoyable.
the Pomo Indians continue to be a large inspiration for Suzanne's baskets
Fiber Work: Suzanne started with wax linen and raffia over reed-coiled baskets. Although time-consuming, the uniqueness of the baskets (made dry) - makes magic when molded. Suzanne continues to make baskets. Additional calligraphy creates her signature pieces.
xuanzhi, Eastern papers nature card front and back with PCI papers
Suzanne now has a studio for calligraphy and newfound knowledge of Islamic geometry and miniature painting. Thanks to online classes at The Prince's Foundation School of Traditional Arts in London. She believes she is one of the few not using watercolors, preferring either thinned-down Schmincke Calligraphy Gouache or Schmincke Aero Color (luscious colors and metallics that are easy to mix). As a calligrapher, she uses raised gold leaf in her work, tooling to add depth and texture to nature's creations. Suzanne often tries new colors and leafing techniques as minis for practice, usually ending up on cards. Since lockdown, her fairytale, incorporating newly learned techniques, comes to life — of course, this is a story about trees & flowers.
tooled gold flowers with "Flecked Nest"

Suzanne teaches very personalized Nature Card workshops limiting participation to four. Contact Suzanne with interest.

. . . it's my favorite way to share an art anyone can have fun learning and easily continue on their own.

For many years Suzanne has made and taught the how-to's to dried botanicals, Asian papers, ribbons, raised gold leaf, and a unique form of Japanese fabric collage, creating handmade books and cards. Handmade books and cards combine her passion for gardening with Asian fabrics and paper. When there is a need for expression, Suzanne carefully presses leaves, flowers, ferns, and grasses during summer and fall for a winter cache.

With Paper Connection’s Paper Pastiche each month I get a sampler of papers to consider for my workshops and play.

If you visit the Delray Beach area in Florida, there is a marvelous exhibit at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens.
xuanzhi, Eastern papers nature card with "Embossed Leaves"

visit: thelakesgallery.com

front and back with PCI papers

contact: suzanne@thelakesgallery.com

www.facebook.com/chilinasianarts

www.instagram.com/thelakesgalleryatchilin/

"Although I have been to Japan many times as a designer, my pipe dream would be to go back and visit the studios of potters or fiber artists I have known and the sites where some of the papers I use and treasure - are made. I hope to learn more about the unique Japanese ways of creation."


2023 All New Paper Pastiche December 21 2022

In July 2022, we launched Paper Pastiche, our monthly subscription service.

We aim to bring paper samples to your door in manageable sizes - for the maker, experimenter, artist, crafter, engineer, and imagineer, who want curated artisan paper samples without the whole-sheet price. The opportunity to experience colors, weights, folding, cutting, and sculpting - Characteristics in easy-to-handle sizes. We immediately got takers, which was so cool! Last month we asked subscribers how we were doing and got great feedback on what they'd like to see plus social media coverage on what folks are making. So many said, 'bring us bigger pieces to play with!'

We heard you!

So let's head into the New Year and turn another page.
Paper Pastiche now comes in 7.5 x 10 in. and 5 x 7.5 in.
8 pieces of beauty, texture, weight, and intrigue. LOVE IT and Sarah Dunn, our amazing packaging maven, and artist. Sarah's design eye is absolutely stunning. We continue to bring new inspirations to you every month and we adore seeing your creations. If you'd like to share with our bigger community let us know.

Best to all, Fricka

Want to sign up?

Fabulously Flexible Hanji November 13 2022


beauty & texture

the delight of windswept edges

our papers help tell your story

How could hanji (Korean paper) be applied in your creative process?
Hanji is becoming a well-known handmade paper in the West. The base fiber is mulberry or dak, in Korean. Sometimes two fibers are mixed, like dak and samjidak, the Korean version of mitsumata or Edgeworthia chrysantha (part of the Thymelaeaceae family of plants). Paper Connection stocks varied weights and colors as part of our extensive inventory of mostly Eastern fine art papers. Depending on characteristics, these papers perform best within book and paper conservation, with others playing a leading role in printmaking, calligraphy, painting, and papercrafts, such as joomchi (paper felting) or jiseung (paper basketry). Home interiors including sliding doors, lanterns, clothing, fans, and heated flooring, are beautifully created, with hanji papers. Durable, smooth, breathable, and who can resist those deckled edges! We stock almost forty colors of hanji and several whites for specific fields and techniques. You can view current stock by clicking here: hanji. Be inspired! Hanji paper by Lee Sun – Future Materials Bank Hanji Meets the World (paperconnection.com) Hanji In The House! (paperconnection.com) Joomchi! Everybody’s talking about it! (paperconnection.com) Artist of the Month: Bill Lorton (paperconnection.com) Artist Julie Miller on Joomchi – Korean Paper Felting (paperconnection.com) Meet PJ Bergin; Hanji’s Newest and Biggest Fan (paperconnection.com) Multimedia Artist – Elisa Lanzi (paperconnection.com) Painting & Calligraphy Paper Plunge (paperconnection.com) Jeannine Mullan: Space, Layers & Chance (paperconnection.com) Play Versus Purpose with A.I.R. Lisa Perez (paperconnection.com) artist of the month printmaker Nichol Markowitz (paperconnection.com) For my collage work and photo transfers I like to use colored hanji (Korean mulberry paper). - Nichol Markowitz


Curating WITH PAPER September 12 2022

I recently curated a gallery group exhibit gallery at Pawtucket Arts Collaborative. Show Title: WITH PAPER, A PAC Gallery Pop-up, showcased works by Bayda Asbridge, Suzi Ballenger, Justine Chang, and myself, Lauren Pearlman Sugita. All 4 participating artists work with paper in different ways with overlaps. The basis, of course, was how we all work with, live with, and communicate with paper.
Lauren Pearlman Sugita, couching, SMFA
handmade paper A Book of Spinach & Feta
handmade flax paper Mollusks from Mars
handmade cotton paper, Laurelai Designs Woven Vines
Putting together such a quick turn-around event like this, definitely challenged my "juggling" skills. I was super-focused and in an abbreviated amount of time, it came together! The collaboration afforded me the opportunity to connect and deepen relationships with three super-talented artists, mainly by spending intimate time with their work. It was interesting for me that the act of curation, allowed me to know each one in a new way (including myself!). As I continually seek community, the experience provided a new path for connectivity and bonds. As WITH PAPER, the gallery show, assembled in just a few days, a "community" was formed. Those connections were the most rewarding gift of WITH PAPER. I requested each of the other 3 artists to send in a comment subsequent to the show.
Bayda Asbridge mixed media Our Village
BAYDA ASBRIDGE writes: I was invited by Lauren Pearlman Sugita from Paper Connection to participate in this pop-up exhibit WITH PAPER at the Pawtucket Arts Collaborative. It was short notice but still, Lauren worked extremely hard to put a very professional show together with our group while maintaining her business during the day. I was incredibly grateful to be invited and to be part of this beautiful exhibit because it gave me a deadline to finish a paper tapestry "San Diego on My Mind", an opportunity to bond with other artists, and the opportunity to reach a wider audience.
Bayda Asbridge mixed media fiber, paper, weaving San Diego on My Mind
Bayda Asbridge mixed media fiber, paper, weaving Blue Lagoon by Bayda Asbridge
SUZI BALLENGER writes: Thank you Lauren for your curatorial wisdom and vision. WITH PAPER became an opportunity to work through my thoughts on the series “To Be of Use”. These works reflect on the interconnection of vitality/detritus, growth/sediment, and need/sacrifice, an exciting exploration worth further investigation. Meeting the other artists was an honor. The work chosen for this exhibit made me feel like I was part of a common understanding and passion.
Suzi Ballenger handmade paper, onion skin To Be of Use
Suzi Ballenger handmade abaca paper, reed, porcupine quills I realized I was the one who was trapped. I just couldn’t swallow another fly!
Suzi Ballenger handmade abaca, hemp Suggestive Freedoms
JUSTINE CHANG writes: The show came together beautifully, and I was honored to be a part. As someone who is new to handmade paper, I’ve been constantly surprised by the generosity of other artists working with paper, including Lauren, Suzi, and Bayda. It was such a meaningful experience, to meet the artists, and to see the response of people who came to view the work. All of this confirms for me, that working with paper is an important way to reconnect with my body, my heritage, and nature.
Justine Chang photography on Korean paper. hanji Series: Margins
Justine Chang photography on Korean paper. hanji Series: Margins

Calling All Makers, Artists, and Imagineers September 01 2022

Fricka Jones, gyotaku, gampi benibana paper, washiMimi King, EtchingThe creative power of the universe flows through each of us. From a single molecule to a supernova, giving voice to our journeys through self-expression is to share with the larger community - to spur our direction with refreshing perspectives, revisited or otherwise. Your platform of sharing and filling can continue here at Paper Connection International. Show your work in paper through your love of paper exploration. Being curious and open has gotten you this far, perhaps changing the way you work with paper and its properties gets you even further. Do you work with our papers? Are you working with our papers? Tell us about it! We'd love to spotlight your maker-ness. Want to share your portfolio or next show? Even better. Click here to leave your contact info and a brief idea of what you are working on/with/out, and we'll get back to you with the next steps. Kit Davies, mini book The soul Fricka Jones, Waterfall, origamiof why we do, what we do here at Paper Connection, is sharing the art and artistry of using paper, from inception to completion. Communities around the world are fed from paper's iterations. Families thrive by providing an art form they can pass down to future generations. You also can be inspired by the beauty, breadth of natural materials, workmanship, and care that goes into each sheet of paper, packed carefully - sent directly to you - ready to help tell your story. Let us give back in this way while giving thanks for all you do.Book with hanji signatures. Bari Zaki. Julie Miller, joomchi, paper felting Click here to tell us more about you.

Starting a Creative Collective May 13 2022

Imagine a world in which we share our gifts.

When resources are scarce, we can pull ourselves inward. Like the folk story, Stone Soup, where the villagers did not want to offer their food to strangers simply because they were strangers. They wanted to remain isolated - to shut out people they felt ungenerous toward, depriving themselves at the same time. We would all feel richer, sharing and receiving, with equal abandon and abundance. In the same vein as the Stone Soup strangers, Kelsey Pike and Adri Luna had the genius to create a vision of feast and good fortune that needed testing, and the journey of Cherry Pit Collective was born.
Simple Beginnings:
Kelsey Pike was looking for a studio space for her hand papermaking business. She longed to reignite a communal studio much like her art school days. Kelsey saw an article about Maker Village, a community wood and metal shop in an underdeveloped area of downtown Kansas City, Missouri. She inquired about available space, explaining her vision: The idea of a communal studio for artists, makers, and creatives where the work and vision of women, non-binary, and marginalized genders/communities are supported and celebrated. The building owners loved the idea as they had been rehabbing the space and were ready to install final details.
Looking towards the Collective's front-facing windows.
Artists need adequate lighting for work throughout the day and night, heating & cooling throughout the year and plenty of electrical outlets for various tools required to create.
Ignited by the first steps, Kelsey and Adri Luna began forming and refining. Working with the landlords, they designed and build-out (and eventually up) the interior space that would become Cherry Pit Collective.
Part of the Pit Collective.
Enter and feel a sense of comfort, inclusion, and safety.
The warehouse, nestled between Maker Village KC and Oddities Print Shop, resides in the center of Kansas City, MO, near the corner of 31st and Cherry. Kelsey and Adri loved the exposed brick interior, thirty-foot ceilings, and tons of natural light from its south-facing glass panel front. There is a mixture of wood and cement floors and an additional skylight at the apex of the roof. The vision was open-ended studio spaces ranging from thirty to two-hundred square feet with simple wooden partitions designating each maker space while still creating community. They kept the basement open with its ten-foot ceilings. Most of the work was completed in 2016. By the summer of 2021 the final touch of a loft, financed by the building owners, was completed. The loft area, built towards the back of the building, houses an ingenious papermaking set-up, washer & dryer, plus an area used for orders and shipping needs.
How did they do it? Money & Resources.
Viewpoint from the front door.
One: Friends & Family Two: Kickstarter & Exceptional Donors Three: Shear Hutzpah Kelsey and Adri wanted to create a space to support female-identifying and marginalized genders/communities.

- There was a story to tell.

A look-see at a workspace.

Like many makers and artists, most work from home, their bedrooms, kitchens, dining room tables, and ill-equipped basement spaces doing double duty. Creators pushed projects aside to accommodate family, children, roommates, day jobs, side businesses, and housework, with a lack of professional places to discuss collaborations and projects that were safe and quiet enough. Cherry Pit Collective would provide dedicated spaces for members to create, meet, and make, leaving home responsibilities to arrive at Cherry Pit Collective. Folks could come ready to work, focused, with space, light, comfort, and community, no longer isolated but in a safe environment for the development and growth of female-fronted businesses. Members would work together to support and promote each other through a shared workspace, shared environment keeping, costs, benefits, and risks. The collective would include monthly programming and skill-sharing events while creating a community of local makers - fostering collaboration over competition. So, in June of 2016, Kelsey and Adri ran a Kickstarter to raise $10,000 for a building deposit and final build-out expenses. For thirty-six days, Kickstarter offered possibilities. Cherry Pit Collective supplied their vision video and perks to backers for exclusive items made by local artists and folks who would be bringing their creativity and community to the Collective. In addition, throughout the campaign, the fledgling collective-to-be hosted a final push event called the Cherry Bomb-A-Thon. The campaign was a success and ended up $180 over the $10,000 goal. ​The Kickstarter took care of much-needed lighting, heating, cooling, and the build-out of electric outlets, making the space more affordable for its members at the get-go.
Welcome to Cherry Pit Collective.
Paying for these expenses upfront, with funds from friends, family, colleagues, and patrons keeps the space more affordable for members. In addition to crowdfunding efforts, they supplemented with annual fundraising events, classes, and monthly fees from members. If you are an artist or craftsperson in the Kansas City area, you may benefit from the minds at Cherry Pit Collective. They host workshops and classes on topics small art businesses need to succeed, such as craft fair booth set-up, filing taxes, fine-tuning SEO for your online shop, and how to get products into local businesses. Q & A with Kelsey Pike What are some obstacles to creating a Collective? In the beginning, we had trouble finding the right balance of work between members. As members grew to know and trust one another and felt autonomy and agency as members of the collective, it was increasingly easy to divide tasks based on personal interests and skills.
Crysta Henthorne - Illustrator, Graphic Designer, and Painter.
Members handle all aspects of managing the collective, including cleaning, promotional work, class programming, event coordination, and member recruitment. What is the significance of being a female-only space? The original mission was to fill the studio with hard-working artists & makers. The first dozen happened to be female-identifying which worked so well that we intentionally moved in that direction, making members feel comfortable, safe, and relaxed while working, freeing themselves, which is sometimes challenging in male-centric workplaces. How important is networking for artists and makers? A community feel is deeply integral to networking, rather than trying to meet the right people or make specific connections. Our collective builds on members with varying skill levels and backgrounds. Businesses are a decade or older, while others are just starting. The aim is to learn from each other. Fresh perspectives help seasoned makers see different vantage points, and established artists offer experiential advice. Members encourage each other to try new approaches, share unique specialties and support each other.
Kelsey Pike working in her papermaking studio.
Kelsey, how did you begin your business - Sustainable Paper+Craft? I learned papermaking in 2010 when I took a class at KCAI called Materials & Methods. I fell in love with the process and decided to make paper for the rest of my life. I started an Etsy shop at the end of that year. The original concept was to sell handmade paper sketchbooks I made as a studio project. The initial sketchbooks sold out. I did the math and realized the direction had to change, and selling loose paper sheets to other artists became the focus. In my senior year, dreading graduation and no longer having access to the paper studio, the thought of never making paper was disheartening. I finished with a degree from the Kansas City Art Institute in Art History and a minor in Printmaking. I tried for grants and got rejected, so I combined my Etsy profits with graduation gifts and purchased my own Hollander beater and other studio equipment that I still use. Initially, how important was branding to you with Sustainable Paper+Art? At the start, my concern with branding was minimal. My primary focus was making the highest quality papers that would perform in a way that brought people back for more. Over time, I made a logo, picked a font, created a website with photos, and it all went uphill from there. Did you have a mission when starting Sustainable Paper+Craft? I had no mission. I just knew I loved making paper and was good at it. More than anything, I wanted people to use what I was making because of its beauty, functionality, a pleasure to the eye, and forgiving qualities.

Kelsey's advice for fledgling makers/starting their own company

Sharpen your craft ⋅ Spend hours, days, and months learning ⋅ Become the expert ⋅ Travel if you can ⋅ Learn from masters ⋅ Read the books ⋅ Never stop practicing and stretching yourself ⋅ Listen and give back

What are the challenges creatives face in your city? Kansas City is a great place to live because it is still relatively affordable. As an artist or entrepreneur, you can pursue your creative interest and still afford to live comfortably. This idea is not lost on the community here and has created a saturation of creatives. With saturation in any field comes competition, the fear that every new venture is somehow detracting from your own. I confirm there is space for further cultivation of new ideas to develop success.
Kelsey Pike and Lauren Pearlman at Cherry Pit Collective in Kansas City, Missouri.
What physical aspects of your co-working community make people feel at home and welcome? The space has several shared areas, open to all members, making it feel like a cozy home. The kitchen, large communal eating area, lounge, and a big backyard with a fire pit give space to individuals outside their studio. Workspaces are open to the communal area, encouraging exchange between studio mates. It is impossible to arrive and not see who else is working, welcoming conversation and closeness. What are your top 3 tips for people hesitant to join a co-working space? We designed our membership admission process to ensure a mutual best fit. Our written application requires answering personal questions, then informal interviews and coffee meetings with members. If the candidate passes all these gateways, we know they will be a great addition, ensuring we have chosen them based on fit and what they offer the collective, as much as them choosing us. For any collective, Kelsey suggests the following:
  1. Test it out. Depending on the space, this might mean attending an event, going for a tour, or checking out open studio hours.
  2. Be your authentic self from day one. You want to connect with meaning and sincerity. These are people you'll see regularly. Allow them to get to know you and be a support system.
  3. Once your space is secured, spend time there. You make connections by showing up.
  4. If applicable, try volunteering in a way that will make you a valuable member of your community.
Cherry Pit Collective stands on ancestral land, honored with gratitude, the land itself and the people who have and continue to steward it - to the people of Kiikaapo (Kikapoo), Wazhazhe Mazhá (Osage), Kaw (Kansa), and Očhéthi Šakówin (Sioux). Kelsey Pike co-founded Cherry Pit Collective, a communal studio space for artists, makers, and creatives, where the work and vision of women are emphasized and celebrated. Kelsey is the cornerstone in creating an environment of members who work, support, and promote each other through a shared workspace and creative communing. Cherry Pit Collective hosts programs fostering collaboration over competition. You can locate Kelsey and view Cherry Pit Collective: Kelsey@Sustainablepapercraft.com cherrypitcollective.com Cherry Pit Collective on Facebook Cherry Pit Collective on Instagram
Fricka Jones - Artist, Writer, Editor
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our papers help tell your story - want more? http://paperconnection.com/news/


SUSTAINABLE PAPER+CRAFT on Ancestral Land in Kansas City, MO April 04 2022


KelsKelsey Pikeey Pike, papermaker, printmaker, and art teacher in Kansas City, Missouri, creates fine handmade papers and products using varied materials that may include rags, raw plant fibers, filaments, threads, gold leaf, and whatever she can get her hands on. Her aesthetics are pure magic. “I have been in love with the obscure and tedious art form of hand papermaking since . . . art school.” In 2021, Pike aimed more of her time making single-run handmade papers. While white papers were her bread and butter, she longed for variety, experimentation, and collaboration with fellow artists/designers. Kelsey’s Monthly Paper Parcel was born with curated and unique colorways offered as a cyclic subscription.
Kelsey Making Paper at Cherry Pit Collective Kelsey Making Paper at Cherry Pit Collective
“. . . the sound of the water, the repetitive motions, the solitude – they put me in a meditative space.”
Monthly Paper Parcel Examples Monthly Paper Parcel Examples
Wet-process, two-sided, de-bossed or gradient sheets, and papers with varietal inclusions such as gold leaf, threads, or fabrics. Each month subscribers receive a package perfect for artists, imagineers, and the creatively curious. “Good craft is important to me, and I am continuously studying, practicing, and learning to make the best paper.” Cherry Pit Collective Kansas City MO Kelsey Pike also co-founded Cherry Pit Collective, a communal studio space for artists, makers, and creatives, where the work and vision of women are emphasized and celebrated. Kelsey is the cornerstone in creating an environment of members who work, support, and promote each other through a shared workspace and creative communing. Cherry Pit Collective hosts monthly programs that include classes and events for skill sharing within the community, fostering collaboration over competition. All are welcome, but female-identifying artists and members of other marginalized communities take priority. ​Cherry Pit Collective resides on ancestral land belonging to the people of Kiikaapo (Kikapoo), Wazhazhe Mazhá (Osage), Kaw (Kansa), and Očhéthi Šakówin (Sioux). “We honor with gratitude the land itself and the people who have and continue to steward it.” You can locate Kelsey and her gorgeous papers and products through: Kelsey@Sustainablepapercraft.com Sustainable Paper+Craft Cherry Pit Collective Instagram Facebook Etsy
Kelsey and Lauren at Cherry Pit Collective Kelsey and Lauren at Cherry Pit Collective

fricka - artist not in residence

Check out our Monthly Subscription Service and Shop Paper Pastiche!

our papers help tell your story

want more? http://paperconnection.com/news/

An Inside Look at Paint & Calligraphy Papers April 25 2021

Character Appeal

Xuan - Super soft, absorbing ink consistently and evenly Pronounced "shwen," this paper provides a pristine surface for writing and painting. Handmade in historic, Anhui Province, China, Xuan has stood the test of time as the ink of ancient scrolls and paintings still retaining its vibrancy to this day. For all levels, this is a quality paper for practice and finished work and very affordable. Mini Xuan paper is a charming handmade paper for writing or incorporating mixed media. Made from recycled materials, including bamboo waste paper, here is a great paper for beginners. Economical and made to support hand/eye development for more solid practices. For all levels, this paper works widely for practice and finished work. Papers great for Asian-style calligraphy (shodō), sumi painting, and fish printing (gyotaku) A lovely assortment includes Kihosen Kana, handmade in Japan with a mix of mitsumata, bamboo, and kōzo fibers. This professional-grade sumi painting or calligraphy paper comes folded and may require a warm iron or just leave rolled for a few days. Currently we sell scroll-sized Kana paper in 10-sheet sets. Soonji made from white Korean mulberry paper (hanji) is also an excellent choice. There is no sizing which makes it absorbent and ideal for calligraphy, Sumi-e, and brush painting amongst other uses. Sunn is a very traditional paper developed in the 8th century for writing religious script and Persian miniature paintings. It is made from raw fermented and cooked hemp and then burnished by hand. The surface is coated with wheat starch, a sizing of egg-white, and alum, burnished with agate to provide a naturally sized surface with an incredible sheen. Yin Yang Dochim Hanji is a beautiful, heavyweight, and burnished mulberry paper. Fibers are compacted and "small-pored," making them great for applying ink with no bleeding. Rustic lokta papers from Nepal are not technically burnished but lokta fiber once made into a sheet is naturally small-pored. Japanese kōzo papers with a bit of internal sizing (sizing added to the vat before formation) are suitable for beginners to experts. If you are unsure what type of kōzo to use, start here for its versatility and price.
Rick Lowe brush painting on lokta paper.
Take a step toward further experimentation! These depicted here are some marvelous papers to explore.
Rona Conti wielding her calligraphy brush.

Sizing - Alum can be a key constituent of your work. When the paper is called "sized" there is usually alum involved. Traditional sizing or size is made with a recipe of animal skin glue and alum to create a barrier in or on the paper so ink does not absorb into the fibers. (Here's a vegan version to DIY sizing). Sized papers are less absorbent and more forgiving of water-based techniques, lending themselves to multiple paint and ink washes/modifications. In other words, sized papers "hold up" against liquids and pigments. Without sizing, paper can be highly absorbent and valued for depth and vividness, allowing painters and calligraphers further complexity to their imagery and characters. Professional brush painters look for the rate of ink absorption. Plus they look for a well-formed sheet which will have an even ink bleed no matter where you place your wet brush. Many of the pros use paper without sizing. Burnished, pressed, or "calendered" paper surfaces will often be sufficient to slow or stop paint from unwanted bleeding. You can bet that most papers from Asia are not sized. fricka-artist/writer/editor our papers help tell your story • want more?

Providence Monthly Focus on PCI February 26 2021

Check it out!

Lauren P. Sugita | Providence Media (providenceonline.com)
Get a glimpse into Lauren and PCI's match-making capabilities. Thank you Providence Monthly! . . . and Thank You Lauren for making a difference, in Providence for 25 years!! papermaking, washi, Japan, paper